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Many, man, many.....
Sure, man, sure.....

I've gotta call BS on you again. I don't believe that you have seen many, many vehicles with leaking fuel injectors that dilute the oil to the point that it causes valvetrain noise. It is just not plausible.

You assert that a leaking fuel injector may have diluted the oil so much that the viscosity is now so low that it causes the hydraulic lash adjuster to be noisy. Do you realize how diluted the oil would have to be in order for that to happen? There would need to be so much fuel in the crankcase that the oil level would be extremely high and other problems would likely be evident. The OP checked the oil and did not mention that it was extremely high. I like to think they would notice that.

In addition to the overfull crankcase, a fuel injector leaking as much as the one in your imaginary scenario would likely result in many other very obvious issues that the OP has not mentioned. These might include, but not be limited to, engine running very poorly with likely misfire and fuel system rich DTCs, clouds of black smoke out of the exhaust and difficulty starting the engine. OP mentioned none of these things.

Let's just wait for O.P. response.
You say that many times but you never did wait for OP response. You just go ahead and describe some unlikely scenario based upon assumptions.

By the way, A good mechanic knows how to diagnose a problem.
I agree.

By the way, judging by the nonsense that you post I would not consider you to be a very good mechanic.

How many ASE certifications do you currently hold?

Changing parts left and right until you find the problem doesn't make you a mechanic.
I agree. We call them parts hangers. They know little to nothing about how things work and hang parts (or recommend that others do so) based upon assumptions and unlikely scenarios they have conjured up in their mind. The worst ones are actually the ones who think they know how things work. They are typically overconfident in their knowledge and abilities. They rarely are able to admit they are wrong even when they are demonstrably proven wrong. In fact, they often double down on their ignorance when confronted.

We should wait for the OP response before making more assumptions.
Maybe we should wait for the OP. However, you recommend the OP hang some parts based upon your assumptions before hearing back from the OP.

I replied plausible to RR's response because it is, and also because he has proven to be an acknowledged person, he even explains the reason for his responses.
I totally agree. I was not questioning the plausibility of Road Ripper's post. He actually provided excellent info of a realistic possibility not some unlikely scenario based upon assumptions. I find most of his posts to be very good and based upon knowledge, experience and facts.

Reason I asked to replace all injectors is because:


1.One failed, others might fail too.
Fair enough but we still haven't established that any injectors have actually failed.

2.Not easy to find the leaky one for the average person.
3.More than one might be leaking.
It would be super easy for the average person with some mechanical skills to find a leaky injector. If that person has the ability to replace a fuel injector he could just as easily diagnose whether or not it is leaking. It's pretty simple really.

Remove the fuel rail from the engine and leave the injectors in place and the fuel supply connected. Power up the fuel pump to pressurize the fuel system. A fuel injector that is leaking enough to cause the scenario you describe (extreme oil dilution) would be pouring fuel from its tip. Any additional leaking injectors would be equally obvious.

See. Easy peasy.

What method did you use to diagnose the many, many vehicles you claim to have encountered with leaking fuel injectors that cause noisy valvetrains?

4.He is alredy there, why not change all at once and save tine and money?
That would be up to the OP to determine what his or her financial resources can tolerate. Checking at RockAuto an extra five injectors would cost anywhere from $100 to almost $270 (plus shipping) depending on the brand selected. In fact you previously voiced the following opinion in this thread regarding an oil pressure sensor:

$10.00 is a lot of money when you don't have them, and wasting them on something that you don't need....:rolleyes:
I agree. Yet you recommend that the OP spend money they may not have on parts they may not need....:rolleyes:

Now, before spending money on injectors, I asked the O.P. to change oil for testing purposes, read my post before jumping into conclusions.


Now, let's wait for O.P. response.
I have read your post. I am not the one who is jumping to conclusions.

You are.

Your entire "diagnosis" is based upon conclusions that you jumped to.

As usual.

Good day, sir.
 

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Sure, man, sure.....

I've gotta call BS on you again. I don't believe that you have seen many, many vehicles with leaking fuel injectors that dilute the oil to the point that it causes valvetrain noise. It is just not plausible.

You assert that a leaking fuel injector may have diluted the oil so much that the viscosity is now so low that it causes the hydraulic lash adjuster to be noisy. Do you realize how diluted the oil would have to be in order for that to happen? There would need to be so much fuel in the crankcase that the oil level would be extremely high and other problems would likely be evident. The OP checked the oil and did not mention that it was extremely high. I like to think they would notice that.

In addition to the overfull crankcase, a fuel injector leaking as much as the one in your imaginary scenario would likely result in many other very obvious issues that the OP has not mentioned. These might include, but not be limited to, engine running very poorly with likely misfire and fuel system rich DTCs, clouds of black smoke out of the exhaust and difficulty starting the engine. OP mentioned none of these things.



You say that many times but you never did wait for OP response. You just go ahead and describe some unlikely scenario based upon assumptions.



I agree.

By the way, judging by the nonsense that you post I would not consider you to be a very good mechanic.

How many ASE certifications do you currently hold?



I agree. We call them parts hangers. They know little to nothing about how things work and hang parts (or recommend that others do so) based upon assumptions and unlikely scenarios they have conjured up in their mind. The worst ones are actually the ones who think they know how things work. They are typically overconfident in their knowledge and abilities. They rarely are able to admit they are wrong even when they are demonstrably proven wrong. In fact, they often double down on their ignorance when confronted.



Maybe we should wait for the OP. However, you recommend the OP hang some parts based upon your assumptions before hearing back from the OP.



I totally agree. I was not questioning the plausibility of Road Ripper's post. He actually provided excellent info of a realistic possibility not some unlikely scenario based upon assumptions. I find most of his posts to be very good and based upon knowledge, experience and facts.



Fair enough but we still haven't established that any injectors have actually failed.



It would be super easy for the average person with some mechanical skills to find a leaky injector. If that person has the ability to replace a fuel injector he could just as easily diagnose whether or not it is leaking. It's pretty simple really.

Remove the fuel rail from the engine and leave the injectors in place and the fuel supply connected. Power up the fuel pump to pressurize the fuel system. A fuel injector that is leaking enough to cause the scenario you describe (extreme oil dilution) would be pouring fuel from its tip. Any additional leaking injectors would be equally obvious.

See. Easy peasy.

What method did you use to diagnose the many, many vehicles you claim to have encountered with leaking fuel injectors that cause noisy valvetrains?



That would be up to the OP to determine what his or her financial resources can tolerate. Checking at RockAuto an extra five injectors would cost anywhere from $100 to almost $270 (plus shipping) depending on the brand selected. In fact you previously voiced the following opinion in this thread regarding an oil pressure sensor:



I agree. Yet you recommend that the OP spend money they may not have on parts they may not need....:rolleyes:



I have read your post. I am not the one who is jumping to conclusions.

You are.

Your entire "diagnosis" is based upon conclusions that you jumped to.

As usual.

Good day, sir.
Why don't you google "leaking injector symptoms" and find out if it often happens or it is just my imagination?

Let me make it easier for you:

Leaking fuel injectors can cause Oil Thinning
At engine shutdown the fuel pressure should maintain operating pressure or just below that for a substantial period of time. Fuel injector pintle, ball or disc seat leaks as well as the bottom O-ring leak on a side feed injector will cause fuel to escape into the intake manifold. From the manifold the fuel will run down to the intake valves. If an intake valve is in the open position that fuel will enter the cylinder where it will leak past the rings and eventually mix with the engine oil.

Oil thinning can lead to engine bearing damage and scorched cylinder side walls. In some cases it can even lead to an explosion inside the engine. Itas been reported that leaking fuel injectors caused hydro lock because so much fuel has accumulated on top of the piston that when the engine was turned over the engine locked because it could not compress the liquid in the cylinder. Hydralock can cause bent connecting rods, broken pistons and blown head gaskets to mention a view. All very expensive repairs.
Source:


Have a great day sir! 🤣
 

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Why don't you google "leaking injector symptoms" and find out if it often happens or it is just my imagination?


Let me make it easier for you:




Source:




Have a great day sir! 🤣
I already knew the symptoms of a leaking fuel injector but just to humor you I did Google search the term "leaking injector symptoms" as you suggested. I checked all of the articles on the first two pages. Not one single website mentioned a noisy valvetrain as a possible symptom.

Since they all say roughly the same thing we can just use the site that you refereed to. Here is their list of symptoms of leaking fuel injectors:

Hard Starting when engine is hot.
Increased Fuel Consumption.
Rough Idle.
Fuel odors inside and around the car.
Poor Emissions.
Oil thinning, which can lead to catastrophic engine failure.
Hydro-lock, which can lead to catastrophic engine failure.


I could add a few more possible symptoms such as MIL illumination with fuel system and/or misfire DTCs and excessive exhaust smoke.

Anyway, as you can see there is nothing about valvetrain noise as a symptom. In fact the OP in this thread did not mention a single one of these possible symptoms. Not one. None. Nada. Zip.

Why on earth would anybody conclude there is a leaking fuel injector if there are none of the symptoms of a leaking fuel injector? Seriously. There are no symptoms.
 

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Audio/Video of sound: Ticking noise from Chrysler Town and Country valve cover area 2006 3.8L

Can anyone with experience with valves/head/cam on Chrysler 4th gens give me their best guess as to what is likely wrong with the top end of our 3.8L.
Recently my wife mentioned a ticking sound from the minivan. She said she first noticed it last weekend. There is also an intermittent oil light that would go on and then off about once twice a week (I assumed was a bad sender). Van has about 230,000 miles and was running well. I suspect the top end/valves have something worn or broken -or less likely a loose timing chain. The oil looks sooty and smells a little like fuel.

1. whats your best guess from the audio.
2. is the van worth saving? (we do still like the van)

Thanks all
It's probably a rocker arm or a rocker stand. Out of 4,000 Dodge/Chrysler minivans sold since 1988 I've only had one 3.3/3.8 engine with a defective rocker arm, so it's a rare. I also had just one with a broken rocker stand and we had to replace the cylinder head. Good luck, I hope it's just a rocker but even if it's a cylinder head it's a cheap fix. You should be able to get a used cylinder head for $35-$50, but take it to the machine shop and have them grind the valves, surface grind and check for cracks. Your van is probably worth saving. I've had some 01-07's with over 400,000 miles. Just took an 05 Grand SE in trade a few weeks ago with 308,000 that had really been roughed up, used commercially and never serviced properly but was still running perfect, even had original transmission. Good luck.
 

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3rd gen > all others
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I love hearing the high mileage stories of these vans.

The rocker pedestals breaking went away after 2000 when the heads were redesigned with 7 pedestals instead of 4.
 
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