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Discussion Starter #1
First - Whats the Best lasting sway bar bushings for 05 T/C?

Oriely's lasted 15,000.

Then used Moog blue from Advance with Moogs links too.

Only 10,000 on them, and I think its that same clucky noise again. Can feel in in the floor with feet. Has newer struts and tie rods.

Stock ball joints at 137K.

If you rock the van side to side pushing above the door, its slightly clunky sounding from suspension.Will inspect further.

thanks
 

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Is the sway bar corroded inside the bushing?

If so, clean it up, grease it up, and noise should go away. Remember, the bushing can't really stop the round sway bar from twisting in the bushing. If they wanted the bushing to resist twisting they would have splined both the bar and the bushing. The bushing resists up/down and front/back motion, and don't let Jeepman and Levy tell you any different.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well it is a sway bar not a Torsion bar, it will twist. These bushings just hold the bar in place. But clunking would mean a gap is present. The tight creaking went away and changed to clunking.
 

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I feel like a sway bar bushing would have to be significantly degraded to produce a clunk through hand rocking the van.
 

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Well it is a sway bar not a Torsion bar, it will twist. These bushings just hold the bar in place. But clunking would mean a gap is present. The tight creaking went away and changed to clunking.
The insert bushing is likely the best. For a short time the insert bushing had a paste (lubricant?) between the insert and the rubber. That didn't last long, back to the drawing board. In the early years of the 4th Generation, there was, at one time, a fabric surface incorporated in the rubber so the bushing could better grab the sway bar. Back to the drawing board.

It is not just a torsion bar but is supposed to be a compression bonding dampening system, restricting the rotation of the sway bar within the bushing. Otherwise wear and tear and lubricant required which Mopar doesn't have a product number for. Go figure marvinstockman, or even better, go find a Mopar lubricant product or grease fitting listed for that bushing. Bet you can't.

New brackets may help considerably, likely a new sway bar would work best.

If interested, I can reference an article on sway bar system designs, consisting of about 5 methods of handling the energy.

If all else fails, lubricate the system to keep it quiet. It won't work as designed that way, but being noisy wasn't a design parameter either.
 

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Jeepman, I hope I don't get you in trouble again, but you never answered me about living in your basement if Trump wins.

That said, can you post the link for the sway bar systems. It will take my mind off the elections.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
One mom and pop shop told me that Chrysler and dodge updated the part of the bushing to a new one about five years ago that has a plastic and or a Kevlar bushing in the middle. I called a Dodge and Chrysler dealer , their parts guys couldn’t find an updated part number. Maybe the shop I talked to is taking generation five bushings and just putting them on generation four vans and it just so happens that they fit even though Dodge and Chrysler doesn’t mention this?

My sway bar is in good condition since this 05 vehicle has only been in snow for five years it’s not rusty underneath at all. Has 138,000 miles.

I will call a better dodge parts department tomorrow if those guys don’t know it - it doesn’t exist.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I feel like a sway bar bushing would have to be significantly degraded to produce a clunk through hand rocking the van.
With these worn bushings you can hear a clunk just from pulling into a driveway. And you can easily rock these vehicles 2 inches high from just pushing above the drivers door which simulates pulling into a driveway at an angle. I thought maybe it could be a ball joint but it’s not making noise is hitting bumps going straight. I haven’t jacked it up yet to check that either.
 

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Maybe some "friction modifier" that I hear about in another Thread will help. :)

Marvinstockman. I'm drawing up plans to widen my parking area to accommodate your three extra vehicles
 

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Your problem is likely the bushings and the brackets. I installed Dorman p/n 928-306 on my 2005 about four years ago. Not a sound since then. Ensure you orient the new bushings properly.
59786
59787
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Your problem is likely the bushings and the brackets. I installed Dorman p/n 928-306 on my 2005 about four years ago. Not a sound since then. Ensure you orient the new bushings properly.
View attachment 59786 View attachment 59787
Hey man that’s good to know. For the picture of those look like just plain old rubber bushings no inserts at all. Where im at I think oRiley sells doorman parts
 

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To add to the confusion, there are two different sway bars on the 4th Generation and different bushing for each. My 2002 GC Sport had touring suspension and a slightly larger sway bar. Although the standard bushing was often used, there was another bushing designated for that bar. It worked just as bad, maybe worse, noisy in less than a week.
New brackets are essential IMO.
 

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Drivin' Maniac
2002 Grand Caravan ES 3.8L
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The goal is to stop the bar from moving in the bushings. You could use glue. Or you could replace the brackets with 'tighter' ones. Or (as I do on all makes) just get some really big pliers with sharp 'jaws' and rough-up the area of the bushing. That way, the rubber will grab the bar and be silent.

I've replaced those sway bar bushings twice in 165,000 miles. Current ones are 75,000 miles old (~9 years).
 

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I think you actually want the bar to move in the bushings. If both front corners move up and down (like going over a speed bump), both ends of the bar will also cycle up and down along with the whole length of the bar. If not, something is going to break since the bar is meant to flex along its entire length (such as going around a corner). I would remove and grease the sway bar bushings in my '87 Camaro once a year so it would rotate freely and not squeak, but they were easy to get to. With a 34mm front bar and 24mm rear bar, is cornered nearly flat. :)
 

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I would go with the bushings that have an insert. The plain ones were problem prone as well. Mopar has the insert bushing as does MOOG. MOOG's initial insert design failed and they updated it.
Mopar 4743024AE Regular sway bar
Mopar 4743041AE Larger diameter sway bar
MOOG K200601 All sway bars

Sway bar systems (5 types)

For more sway bar stuff do a Google search using "SAE 2003-01-0239 Bushing Characteristics of Stabilizer Bars"
 

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I've attached a Moog "problem solver" writeup that provides two Moog part numbers for sway bar bushings, one part number without nylon insert and one part number with. I believe this is a 2012 document.

I've also attached a Moog "problem solver" writeup on the swaybar links... as well as the older Moog bushing. I believe this is a 2007 document.

I currently have the Moog K7258 links and the Moog K200601 bushings with nylon inserts on my 2005.

The bushings seem to have held up fairly well with over 100,000 miles on them and still no noise.

The links, on the other hand, had to be replaced at about 90,000 miles... and I was absolutely on top of the lubrication on the links every time I rotated tires, serviced brakes, or had the front wheels off for any reason.

One thing I discovered about the Moog links is that there are at least two significantly different link designs out there with one of those two providing better grease seals than the other; however, they are marked as the same part numbers. Another big difference is that one of these designs comes with the zerks pre-installed and ball joints pre-lubed while the other design comes with zerks you have to install yourself prior to lubricating the ball-joints yourself.

So, one question I have is whether your moog links got properly lubricated at install and whether they've been serviced with fresh lube on a regular basis? Failure to lubricate up the set that comes unlubricated would put a quick end to a set of these...

Another clunk source I've seen is the strut rod center nut working loose inside the upper strut mount. This seems to be a common problem with "quick struts..."
 

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Drivin' Maniac
2002 Grand Caravan ES 3.8L
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I think you actually want the bar to move in the bushings.
When they move, that results in the noise. If the rubber just twists (its not much) then they do the job of isolating.

Poly bushings (because they are a LOT stiffer) need to be lubricated so that they can 'move'.

Apparently the later MOPAR bushings with the inserts ARE supposed to twist, silently. (Doesn't always work...)

+++++++++++

Thanks to the links that Jeepman provided in Post 15, we can see that Chrysler intended our sway bar bushings to be "systems that use compressive bonded bushings". My actions (either glue or serrating the bar itself to provide grip) provide a longer lasting lack of noise...as once the previous set of bushings starts to slip, the bar surface becomes slippery and smooth.
 
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In my past life, I was a mechanical engineer. I worked on submarine silencing and not vehicles, and I personally kept all of you safe for many years. Yes, even you Canadians!

Now, and as I've said for many years, I've shouted from the rooftops, that the horrible noise we hear is 'stick-slip'. The bar is twisting in the bushing, the bushing is resisting the twist, and then the bar finally breaks loose and we hear a noise. Why our vans are worse than others, I can't say, but I can say that if the vans were submerged, they wouldn't squeek! The wouldn't float, but they wouldn't squeek.
 

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When they move, that results in the noise. If the rubber just twists (its not much) then they do the job of isolating.

Poly bushings (because they are a LOT stiffer) need to be lubricated so that they can 'move'.

Apparently the later MOPAR bushings with the inserts ARE supposed to twist, silently. (Doesn't always work...)

+++++++++++

Thanks to the links that Jeepman provided in Post 15, we can see that Chrysler intended our sway bar bushings to be "systems that use compressive bonded bushings". My actions (either glue or serrating the bar itself to provide grip) provide a longer lasting lack of noise...as once the previous set of bushings starts to slip, the bar surface becomes slippery and smooth.
Now, if I could only convince marvinstockman. :)

Oh well, I will have lots of time when he moves in. :)

The front sway bar bushings on my Jeep are original and quiet as a mouse after 17 years. They are compression bonded, no grease fittings. It's a two bolt system with a larger bushing. Lots of travel in that suspension.

The one bolt/tab bracket system on the Caravans is a poor design.
 
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