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2005 Dodge Grand Caravan C/V
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Unless the bolt is tiny, I'd just leave it like that. Or, just drill it out and put a bolt and nut close to the original size in there. Nothing really wrong with doing that.
 

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07 Grand Caravan (3.3L), 14 Dart SXT (2.0L)
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Discussion Starter #22
You didn't tell us about that slot. Just pickin brains? :)
Nah man, I didn't think my hand would fit in! Decided to squeeze it in and I barely fit with my wrench in my hand lol
 

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Nah man, I didn't think my hand would fit in! Decided to squeeze it in and I barely fit with my wrench in my hand lol
Where there's a will, there's a way. :)

I'm working on a stubborn 13 mm bolt that refuses to move. Only suppose to be 40 ft. lb. of torque on it but some wacko with an impact wrench torqued it up to 140 ft. lb. (just a guess, but likely close). I'm thinking about drilling the head off it. Should be about 3/16" of bolt sticking out after the torque is released (bolted part is that thick). Vice grips can get hold of that. Nut remover and impact wrench has failed so far. The washer is part of the bolt head, all one piece.

I'll leave you guys to guess what bolt it is. :)

Anyway, I getting a fresh nut remover this evening or tomorrow.

Worse case scenario - weld a nut on. Not in the best location to weld though.
 

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Where there's a will, there's a way. :)

I'm working on a stubborn 13 mm bolt that refuses to move. Only suppose to be 40 ft. lb. of torque on it but some wacko with an impact wrench torqued it up to 140 ft. lb. (just a guess, but likely close). I'm thinking about drilling the head off it. Should be about 3/16" of bolt sticking out after the torque is released (bolted part is that thick). Vice grips can get hold of that. Nut remover and impact wrench has failed so far. The washer is part of the bolt head, all one piece.

I'll leave you guys to guess what bolt it is. :)

Anyway, I getting a fresh nut remover this evening or tomorrow.

Worse case scenario - weld a nut on. Not in the best location to weld though.
SUCCESS!!

Drilled the bolt head/washer combo down to where the washer face touched the steering wheel frame. Eventually had a 1/4" diameter hole which was about the shank diameter of the bolt. Decided to tap the washer with a punch to see if it would turn. 'Twas a site for sore eyes. The bolt had weakened and lost its torque. Out comes the bolt and washer in one piece. Didn't even scratch the steering wheel frame. Hole was about 1/2" deep.

Where there's a will, there's a way. :)
 
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You could do it !


... and you did, you did !
 

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...after the previously recorded word from our moderator, we now return to our regular programming.

It is an animalistic approach, but perhaps a properly sized lag bolt and shaping the stripped out hole to accept it. If you consider a sheet metal screw, it is basically a wood screw of design.

Another possibility would be a forged TEK-5 metal screw. It is made of forged high carbon steel, it is self drilling, it is self tapping. About a #12 screw or two should hold fast.

I've shot these into 1/2" thick I-beam with a battery drill. Speed and pressure is the key to success.

Another cob solution is to jam a wedge into the hole with the bolt. Something like a nylon tail of a tywrap would work to squish into grabbing anything it can AND be malleable enough to 'make threads'... copper wire... Stainless steel wire... Some oak splinters...
Like when you strip out a screw hole on a Steinway Piano... you jam some tooth picks in the gouge, break them clean/flush, and then ram the screw back in. As the screw penetrates the picks, it will expand in the hole and you achieve a friction fit and form new threads.

Glad to have been some help for a change...
Cheers!
 

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The old tooth pick trick. Yep, I have used that several times, with glue too. Wire? Yes, that as well.

You sure know how to hold a jalopy together. :)
 

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2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 4.0
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Like when you strip out a screw hole on a Steinway Piano... you jam some tooth picks in the gouge, break them clean/flush, and then ram the screw back in. As the screw penetrates the picks, it will expand in the hole and you achieve a friction fit and form new threads.

Glad to have been some help for a change...
Cheers!
I've done that for screw holes in door jambs in our house. :)
 

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Is there any cheapo way to tap it without buying a kit? Like using an old bolt as a tap? lol
I know you've solved the problem by now, but just so you know, one can buy individual taps of whatever size you need. And no, an old bolt will not tap threads in anything harder than plastic.
If you plan on doing much work on old cars, a tap and die set can be indispensable. Wait until you see one on sale and go for it. Another thing to have is a thread cleaning tap/die set.
 

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I have a tap and die set and never use it. I haven't graduated from the tooth pick solution. :)
 

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I've had a tap and die set for years, it got a lot of use on older cars with stripped out threads. Also have a thread chaser kit when working on parts that haven't been unbolted before or in a long time and need the threads cleaned out, like intake and head bolt holes.
 

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I've had a tap and die set for years, it got a lot of use on older cars with stripped out threads. Also have a thread chaser kit when working on parts that haven't been unbolted before or in a long time and need the threads cleaned out, like intake and head bolt holes.
Ever use a chaser when replacing spark plugs?
 

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Ever use a chaser when replacing spark plugs?
Only a couple times that I remember. First time on my GTO when it had 100k miles (I had just bought it), and another time on the used heads I had bought and cleaned up. I don't use a ton of anti-seize on the plugs, so they thread nearly all the way in by hand.
 

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Only a couple times that I remember. First time on my GTO when it had 100k miles (I had just bought it), and another time on the used heads I had bought and cleaned up. I don't use a ton of anti-seize on the plugs, so they thread nearly all the way in by hand.
I've changed a ton of spark plugs and never used a chaser.
Using chaser is mentioned fairly often though

Anti-seize, not on new plugs. Years ago, motor oil was what I used. :)
 
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Discussion Starter #38
Just got a rivet nut tool with some threaded rivets to fix this problem and some others around the house. Easy peasy thanks for letting me know about this tool :)
 
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