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2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3.8); 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan eL (3.8)
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LOL First, these vans don't have a mass airflow sensor. They have a MAP sensor in the far end of the upper intake manifold, and an Intake Air Sensor in the intake tube before the throttle body. Anyway, problem is fixed and it was not a sensor.
For the record, it's "Intake Air Temperature Sensor"
 

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It was straight forward. Under $40 at oriellys for the flex plate. Just ordered it for the van. Chrysler products all have one offset hole. You just got to put them in until you find the right combination. But they fit flawlessly.
Well, my experience was that I tried all four combinations of alignment to bolt up my new torque converter from ETE Transmission Remanufacturers, and none of the positions would work. Some hammer mechanic advised to waller out the hole...
I wouldn't do it. I got spec torque converter from Mopar certified rebuilt and it aligned. I don't think I had to try to find any offset hole to get it bolted up. I think mine was symetrical (that or I scored the 1 in 4 chance that my first try was the right one)
 

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3rd gen > all others
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For the record, it's "Intake Air Temperature Sensor"
Whoops! I was typing so fast I was thinking it, but forgot to actually type it. Thanks for the correction. :)
 

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Now to track down the rear exhaust leak somewhere around the manifold
FYI, if you've got an OEM cat with the original flex section up at the header flange then it's pretty common for that flex section to crack and cause an exhaust leak. Due to the design of that flex section with a "collar" on each end, it's usually difficult (if not impossible) to see the cracking as the cracking usually occurs right where the flex meets the flange (up under the collar).

Ooops... I see Road Ripper beat me to it.
 

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I've thought about trying to cut the center section from a flex plate (inside of the tone ring) and "double up" the thickness of the flex plate using it with another one. They seem to flex too much and crack. I have a theory that some get loose, and the engine and transmission are NOT supported equally from the factory (the location of the front and rear mounts). Front mount bolted to engine, rear mount bolted to transmission. Bolts get loose, engine/transmission interface "flexes" under load, and flex plate is overworked and cracks. There are also no "stiffener brackets" from engine to transmission on the bottom, as Toyota does.
Maybe preventative maintenance on these vans with higher mileage is to support the engine/transmission and retorque all of the mating bolts.
Those bolts never get loose, so no P.M. needed. Who in his right mind would remove transmission as a P.M. just to check torque of those bolts? You would better off waiting until flexplate cracks and then replace it.

Flexplate is designed to "flex", so don't even try to reinforce it, you may end up with a broken transmission.

There are some companies who make heavy duty "flex plates" for racing, but then they also use heavy duty transmissions and know the risk.

In racing, you always take risks, all you want is to win that race, don't matter what.

On my 2012 T&C I replaced flexplate three times, never found a loose bolt.
 

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The bellhousing bolts. In my rambling I should have clarified that. I didn't want to lose my train of thought while typing. No transmission removal needed. Engine and transmission could flex differently under load per mount attachment locations and lack of engine-transmission stiffener brackets, making the flex plate bend more than designed so it cracks. Checking/keeping the bellhousing bolts tight is the first easiest step in preventing that from happening. After that is designing/building/adding stiffener braces on the underside of the engine to transmission. Might be a good idea for towing. This is just theory, as maybe the fault lies in the flex plate itself which has excessive runout even when new. Then when installed and bolted up it is under tension by the flatness of the torque converter or crankshaft, vs. the flex plate being made bent. When running, it is flexed even more until it cracks.
 

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I haven't read through this entire thread, but has anybody considered the three engine and one trans. mounts. These are what stabilizes the engine and trans. under load.
 

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Did anyone, other than, me notice the change in the two flex plates in post #50 pictures?

A potential stress relief or a point for the stress to manifest?
 

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Did anyone, other than, me notice the change in the two flex plates in post #50 pictures?

A potential stress relief or a point for the stress to manifest?
You already pointed that out on that # 55

Yes, no way we could not notice it.

But newer vehicles doesn't have that "reinforcement", so probably it was not a good idea after all.
 

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The bellhousing bolts. In my rambling I should have clarified that. I didn't want to lose my train of thought while typing. Checking/keeping the bellhousing bolts tight is the first easiest step in preventing that from happening. After that is designing/building/adding stiffener braces on the underside of the engine to transmission. Might be a good idea for towing. This is just theory, as maybe the fault lies in the flex plate itself which has excessive runout even when new. Then when installed and bolted up it is under tension by the flatness of the torque converter or crankshaft, vs. the flex plate being made bent. When running, it is flexed even more until it cracks.
It could be a good idea but, I've never seen any of those bolts getting loose, never. As a matter of fact, many times those bolts are so tight that you have a very hard time loosing them up.

Have you ever found one of those bolts loose?

Have you ever checked those bolts as a P.M. yourself? probably not.
 

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It could be a good idea but, I've never seen any of those bolts getting loose, never. As a matter of fact, many times those bolts are so tight that you have a very hard time loosing them up.

Have you ever found one of those bolts loose?

Have you ever checked those bolts as a P.M. yourself? probably not.
I'm thinking they are thread locked, probably red (almost permanent, needs heat)
 
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