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Transmission return line, even better. Any comments on its performance?

I believe you had some transmission work done too and the transmission shop used Amsoil for the fill. How did that work out?
Not sure if the Magnefine did much, but it certainly gave me peace of mind. I did open it up by unscrewing the cap, and if I remember, it had some of they typical metallic paste on the magnet, but nothing in the pleats of the filter. I cleaned it up, screwed it back together and put it back into service.

I had my torque converter replaced by a local shop. In at least three conversations I had with the shop before and during the repair I specified NOTHING but ATF+4. The guy agreed to use ATF+4, but when I got my bill, it had written in it, "Amsoil Signature Series ATF". Although I was not impressed, I experienced no issues with it. I did sell it though probably a year or more after that.

I'm not sure what originally caused the torque converter failure, but it may have started after Canadian Tire did a flush. They used a universal ATF, failed to properly seal the pan and all the fluid leaked out on my mother-in-laws driveway. They towed it back to CT and sealed the pan, and likely filled it with the same non approved fluid. Not knowing at the time about the requirement for ATF+4, I probably drove it for some time before becoming aware of the requirement. In fact, the first change I did myself, I was provided with a multivehicle ATF by the store. So, the poor van had run for quite some time on the wrong ATF. Once I got wise, I did several changes with ATF+4 over my ownership, but it's likely the damage was already done.
 
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This started as an oil change interval thread and migrated to transmission fluid concerns.
1) I "always heard" that transmission filters were just rock catchers. By "rocks" I think they mean 200 microns or larger.
2) The ease of changing an external filter allowed vehicle owners to avoid clogged filters. How diligently Joe Average maintains such a filter is open for discussion.
3) I also heard that pressures in transmission cooling lines aren't high so any filter's restrictive properties need be known.
 

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1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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This started as an oil change interval thread and migrated to transmission fluid concerns.
1) I "always heard" that transmission filters were just rock catchers. By "rocks" I think they mean 200 microns or larger.
2) The ease of changing an external filter allowed vehicle owners to avoid clogged filters. How diligently Joe Average maintains such a filter is open for discussion.
3) I also heard that pressures in transmission cooling lines aren't high so any filter's restrictive properties need be known.
There is an internal bypass on the transmission cooler circuit. There is 35 - 100 psi on the transmission cooler circuit in all gears and park at 1500rpm.
After the fluid returns from the cooler or bypasses it, it is used for the lubrication circuit of the transmission. The lubrication circuit is entirely fed by the cooler.

A filter on the cooler or cooler return line is effectively putting a filter immediately in front of the bearings.
 
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I change the oil once per year with synthetic oil regardless of mileage. Typically that ends up between 10-15k miles. I change it myself using a pump from the dipstick tube... absolutely the easiest way to DIY.
 

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I change the oil once per year with synthetic oil regardless of mileage. Typically that ends up between 10-15k miles. I change it myself using a pump from the dipstick tube... absolutely the easiest way to DIY.
Which filter are you using? Not a bad idea doing it that way as you can do it all from the top. I expect you can get just as much out as you would using the drain bolt. Unlike the transmission, you can probably get right to the bottom of the pan.
 

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I change the oil once per year with synthetic oil regardless of mileage. Typically that ends up between 10-15k miles. I change it myself using a pump from the dipstick tube... absolutely the easiest way to DIY.
Using a dipstick oil pump every time is not recommended. You'll never drain sediments.
 

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I just shuddered when I read that. For our cars/vans, I jack up the vehicle so the oil drain plug is lower than the rest of the pan, just to make sure I get as much out from the bottom of the oil pan. Maybe it doesn't make a difference in the real world, but I can't imagine only sucking the oil out and feeling like a did it the right way.
 

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I just shuddered when I read that. For our cars/vans, I jack up the vehicle so the oil drain plug is lower than the rest of the pan, just to make sure I get as much out from the bottom of the oil pan. Maybe it doesn't make a difference in the real world, but I can't imagine only sucking the oil out and feeling like a did it the right way.
For sure it's best to use the drain plug. I suppose if someone doesn't have the means to lift the vehicle, sucking the oil out is a viable option. I've strained oil coming out of the drain plug and found nothing in terms of sediment/contaminants. You might actually be able to get more out if you have a power pump and flexible hose. Is the drain plug at the very lowest point of the pan? I can't remember and just did an oil change a week or so ago.
 

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I think the baker :) does his oil changes with a pump and has done so for some time.

The marine guys know all about pumping motor oil out through the dipstick tube, been doing it for eons.

Mercedes had/have an oil extractor setup on their engines.

Nothing new about the process. Moving the tube around in the pan will likely get rid of any residual, perhaps more readily, under suction, than a drain plug.

I have suspected a couple of overfills, some years back, to be due to poor oil extraction used back then by some shops. The instantly dirty oil sort of confirmed that.

Replacing lube techs with oil-draining devices can save money, boost efficiency
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Last year, Kane developed a different solution: He paired a single quick-service tech with a device that extracts used oil automatically from a car or truck during an oil change. Kane estimates the shift is saving each of the dealerships at least $95,000 a year.

And because use of the oil extractor eliminates the need to remove a vehicle's drain plug, Kane expects to save thousands more each year on damage claims that previously arose from stripped or loose plugs and related mishaps.
Perhaps worthwhile to add a magnet to the outside of the oil pan though.
 

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Replacing lube techs with oil-draining devices can save money, boost efficiency
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Perhaps worthwhile to add a magnet to the outside of the oil pan though.
It doesn't say it is the best for the car owner. They are talking about efficiency for the shop owner.

One technician working on each vehicle instead of two.

Nothing as removing the drain plug "using the proper tools" and let it drain.
 
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