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I've noticed my local Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep dealer's cars all have the green tire valve stem caps which I assume denotes nitrogen fill. All of their new vehicles have it but I've also noticed even the used ones do. I guess that means every vehicle they get in new or trade in has to have the tires emptied and refilled. Anyone else seen dealers do this? My guess is they do it because it means if the tires get low then customer has to come back to dealer for refill.

My understanding is the nitrogen fill is really bettter for vehicles that don't move around as much (such as maybe a camper, motorhome or trailer) since they don't leak down as much over time. Otherwise I think it's rather pointless.
 

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Meh, nitrogen-smitetrogen, good old fashioned air is already 78% nitrogen; getting tires filled with nitrogen in the low 90% range won't yield much, if any benefit.
 

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Not many will be able to accurately provide feedback on this matter.

Yes, I've seen deakerships moving to Nitrogen, especially those who sell high end vehicles.

I do own a Nitrogen generator machine, so I use nitrogen on all my vehicles.

Something good to point out is, you can adjust nitrogen purity. Dealers might adjust from 50% nitrogen to 99% purity. 95% being the std.

If you go the nitrogen route, make sure you ask what the nitrogen purity is in their system.

The better the purity is, the slower the nitrogen generator is, that is one of the reasons the dealer might set their nitrogen generators lower than 95%.

Since I only use my generator on my own tires, I had it set up for 96%+ purity, but it takes a little longer for the unit to build up pressure.

Filters are very expensive too (on the $100.00's range).

Many who never used nitrogen on their vehicles claim it might be just a waste of money, it might be, who knows.

For more information, read this NHTSA document.
 

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Here's the thing about introducing even 99% pure nitrogen into a tire; unless you can confidently vacate the entire volume the wheel between the rim and inside of the tire, you are still going to have some oxygen in the mix; I've read studies where, at best, 99% nitrogen will yield a mixture in the tire of only about 95%.
 

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You know what I believe it is, TPMS.

We service jet tires with N2 nitrogen because it is dry. At altitude, so I was told when I started in aviation maintenance, dry nitrogen will not form ice crystals??? I think it has more to do with stopping corrosion in both the expensive jet wheels AND in today's modern vehicles equipped with TPMS modules.
 

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I would like to see evidence of humid, even REALLY humid air in a tire causing a TPMS failure. As for wheel failure, typically the only issues I see when expensive alloy wheels are bead leaks where the inner edge of the rim gets corroded by external moisture and salt; once again, nothing to do with humid tire air.
 

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You know what I believe it is, TPMS.

We service jet tires with N2 nitrogen because it is dry. At altitude, so I was told when I started in aviation maintenance, dry nitrogen will not form ice crystals??? I think it has more to do with stopping corrosion in both the expensive jet wheels AND in today's modern vehicles equipped with TPMS modules.
Some people drive so fast, they only hit the ground from time to time. I suppose that qualifies for nitrogen use, certainly saves on tire wear. :)
 

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Here's the thing about introducing even 99% pure nitrogen into a tire; unless you can confidently vacate the entire volume the wheel between the rim and inside of the tire, you are still going to have some oxygen in the mix; I've read studies where, at best, 99% nitrogen will yield a mixture in the tire of only about 95%.

What I do:

  1. First remove as much cheap air as possible (see image below).
  2. Connect all four nitrogen hoses
  3. The Nitrogen generator will automatically fill and purge all four tires at the same time, three times.
  4. I'll manually purge and fill one additional time.
At this time Nitrogen purity should be close to 99%.

Doubt any shop will do all this for their customers.

Removing air before starting the nitrogen purging process:
58610
 

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Yeah, that'll get better than 98%, maybe 99%; but in the end, what is the benefit?
 

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Hard to tell, as you know, proving a positive (nitrogen is a benefit) with a negative (the tires didn't have a problem for 111,000 miles) is a non-starter in engineering circles. My take is modern all-season rubber, especially when used for lots of highway duty, will easily last 80,000 miles. Significantly more depending on brand and such.
 
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Hard to tell, as you know, proving a positive (nitrogen is a benefit) with a negative (the tires didn't have a problem for 111,000 miles) is a non-starter in engineering circles. My take is modern all-season rubber, especially when used for lots of highway duty, will easily last 80,000 miles. Significantly more depending on brand and such.
You are 100% correct, but being realistic, those tires were not close to the end of it's useful life. I would assume they could be used another 20-30,000 miles.

A scientific test by NHTSA should be credible, don't you think so?

Anyways, nitrogen didn't prevented that tire from leaking aftet all. :)

But yes, highway use mostly accounted for the long life of those tires.
 

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Aircraft require nitrogen because at takeoff / landing speeds a solid chunk of ice (due to water accumulation in a tire) can cause the tire to rupture... (IIRC, this was a particular problem with Concords due to extreme tire stress).

If it tickles your pride, get nitrogen or better yet argon - while it will reduce pressure flux with temps a little, nothing replaces good 'ole tire maintenance.

One respectable person told me off the record that green caps at the dealer are primarily to keep customers coming back for service (rather then DIY or going to indy shop) and claimed without a shred of evidence that they needed to replace fewer tires under warranty due to knuckleheads driving underinflated...
 

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You are 100% correct, but being realistic, those tires were not close to the end of it's useful life. I would assume they could be used another 20-30,000 miles.

A scientific test by NHTSA should be credible, don't you think so?

Anyways, nitrogen didn't prevented that tire from leaking aftet all. :)

But yes, highway use mostly accounted for the long life of those tires.
LEVY, you forgot to subtract the miles you put on your winter snow tires. Just sayin. :)
 

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Don't know if nitrogen helped or not, but I changed those good tires only because I got a flat and tires had over 111,000 miles on it.

View attachment 58613

View attachment 58615
Which tires did you use? Will consider those for my next replacement.

Were the tires you pictured on the same vehicle? the tread pattern looks different, hope you weren't running mismatched tires, especially on the same axle.
 

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Which tires did you use? Will consider those for my next replacement.

Were the tires you pictured on the same vehicle? the tread pattern looks different, hope you weren't running mismatched tires, especially on the same axle.
Those were the O.E. Kumho tires.

Now that you mentioned it, those tires do look different. Maybe the guy who installed the new tires just didn't pay attention and mixed the cores. I didn't paid attention either.




Got a flat today.

After 111,000 miles on the original tires, I thought it was time to replace them anyways.

Nitrogen filled @ 42 lbs.

View attachment 58521 View attachment 58522
Found the culprit:

View attachment 58525

Then, I found this hard plastic label inside the tire:

View attachment 58526
 

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I check my tires every couple of months and unless I run over something, only need air twice a year. Had a brand new Sentra some years back with factory hydrogen filled tires, it actually needed air more often. Pretty sure it had more to do with my wife's reckless driving than what was in the tires, but still showed no noticeable improvement from the nitrogen fill.

And before anyone says something, yes, the minivan street racer called out his wife for reckless driving. :p I drive fast, she drives insane... 4 lane interstate merge in 100ft without looking first insane. Damn near had to clean the passenger seat after that one.
 

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Haven't done any research but I suspect concrete pavement, versus asphalt, would prolong the life of the tires, less heat to deal with.
 

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Haven't done any research but I suspect concrete pavement, versus asphalt, would prolong the life of the tires, less heat to deal with.
You might be right.

Most of my miles are on Mexican roads. Most of the Mexican roads are made of concrete.
 

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I never get my tires nitrogen filled, and I never have issues with leaks caused by corrosion. Road hazards, alignment, and suspension have a far greater effect on the life of a tire. Nitrogen isn't worth the hassle or cost, in my opinion.
 
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