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Discussion Starter #41
Those codes together imply that the fluid level was low enough or the filter plugged enough that the pump was not able to supply adequate pressure. There's a chance this could be a failing pressure sensor as well though. Why didn't the guy pull live data? He should have looked to see what the reported line pressure actually was, as well as the voltage across the sensor. It's like nobody even tries anymore.
I don't know, And you're right. I feel like he jumped to the new trans conclusion before he even looked at it. He said the pump sounded bad, and it was likely a worst-case scenario. Then suddenly after me saying I wasn't sure I wanted to replace the trans he told me he could drop the pan and take a closer look. Then he "had better news" and "wasn't as bad as he thought" and said the filter was a bit clogged and it was running better with the new filter. I don't know. He was very vague about everything after I said I didn't want to do the trans yet. The last thing he said was "maybe you'll get lucky and this will get you through winter" Still not feeling confident and not sure what to do with this. .
 

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Recently posted about some issues I was having after having a waterpump and serp belt replaced a couple weeks ago.

Fast forward- I was driving my 2011 T&C (80kmi) yesterday when suddenly I started hearing whining noises. The longer I drove the louder it got. Whenever I stopped at a red light and would start to go, the RPM's would shoot up, I'd have some hesitation and then I would start to move. Same thing would happen when going in reverse. Check engine light came on shortly after.

Brought it in, trans shop said he got a few codes but didn't tell me exactly what they were. Based on what he said my guess is P0944 (Hydraulic Pressure Unit Loss of Pressure) is one of them. He told me he thinks something is clogging the filter and he's thinking it's likely a new trans. I called him back today and asked more questions and he told me that if he drops the pan, he would get a better idea, he could probably change the filter and it could buy me some time. He also mentioned if there is nothing in the pan, it's likely electrical. WHAT THE ****?!

When it comes to the trans, We're talking a difference of $2,200 for a rebuild and $100 for a filter here. I have ZERO knowledge on any of this so this sounds really confusing. Would I really need a new trans if the filter is bad? I can tell you that when I look up the "symptoms" of a clogged filter, that's EXACTLY what I was experiencing. But, why did that happen so suddenly? Could it have anything to do with the repairs I just had done? Just seems so close to having other work that it's a bit concerning. DIdn't have any issues like this prior to the other work. Also, if it is a new trans, is it worth it to have it done? Looking for some advice or questions to ask- not trying to get fed a line!
My 2013 GC at 70k was doing similarly to yours, I changed Transmission filter which was clogged with pan gasket sealant from the factory. I also did a complete fluid change and added 4 oz bottle of Mopar 04318060AD limited slip additive, I now have 122k on van with no more transmission problems. Don’t listen to those naysayers about the additive, it works. Too many of these transmissions are being replaced needlessly.
 

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My 2013 GC at 70k was doing similarly to yours, I changed Transmission filter which was clogged with pan gasket sealant from the factory. I also did a complete fluid change and added 4 oz bottle of Mopar 04318060AD limited slip additive, I now have 122k on van with no more transmission problems. Don’t listen to those naysayers about the additive, it works. Too many of these transmissions are being replaced needlessly.
His transmission problems were due to a clogged filter. Adding that additive was not the cure, who knows if that transmission is actually working as it should or not.

This person also claims Chrysler O.E. ATF+4 is of inferior quality :oops:.

I highly recommended Castrol ATF 4 fluid. Cheaper fluids don’t have the necessary additives these high tech torque converters with clutches need. These transmissions are actually tough, the problem is the OEM fluids are not. The Mopar warranties are not customer friendly since Fiat controls Chrysler. I was at 95k when my transmission started giving problems, dealership wanted 3500 would not honor warranty because Chrysler is so stingy paying them, a fluid and filter change fixed my problem. Good Luck
Do you have proof Castrol ATF 4 is better than other brands of ATF+4.
Yes after 25,000 miles changing from OEM oil to Castrol with zero problems.j
ENGINEERED TO EXCEED SPECIFICATIONS
Automatic transmissions are now more complex than ever, placing ever-greater demands on auto transmission fluids. In fact, the automatic transmission is perhaps the most complicated mechanical component in an automobile. The automatic transmission combines electrical & mechanical systems, hydraulics and computer processors to smoothly shift through the gears and transfer engine power to the drive wheels.
Exceeds all OEM oil specs low quality ATF oils marginally meet.
There are 3 basic types of automatic transmissions found throughout the world. The Dual Clutch Transmission (or DCT), the Continuously Variable Transmission (or CVT) and the step-type transmission which is the most common, especially here in the US. There are several main components that make up the step-type transmission. The pump supplies pressurized transmission fluid for many uses throughout the unit. The planetary gear sets provide the chosen gear ratios for the vehicle. Clutches or “clutch packs” engage and disengage the gear sets. The Torque Converter connects the transmission to the engine and multiplies the torque during initial acceleration. It uses two turbines which spin independently, but which are fluid coupled allowing the engine to idle while the engine is stopped and produce smoother acceleration as it shifts through the gears. Finally, the Mechatronics is the “brain” of the transmission, a complex system of ports, valves and electronics that control all transmission functions.

The one component of the entire system that’s critical to all of these parts working properly together is the Automatic Transmission Fluid, or ATF. It acts as a hydraulic fluid, to engage clutch packs & shift the gears. It acts as a corrosion inhibitor and wear protection for the Planetary Gear sets. It has to flow easily from minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit to nearly 400, even in fine valve assemblies. The ATF precisely controls friction in the clutch packs and maintains it throughout the drain interval … which is perhaps the most important property of an ATF all while providing lubrication to hundreds of moving parts even under high temperatures and extreme pressure. So using the right ATF is critical to the performance and long life of your transmission.
Dale,

I wouldn't even bother to read all that.

Do you know all ATF+4 need to be licensed by Chrysler?

That means all ATF+4 , regarding brands needs to meet Chrysler specs.


Have a nice day.
And then.....Silence! 🤣
 

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ATP AT-203 Synthetic Automatic Transmission Fluid Friction Modifier

  • Converts Dex / Merc ATF to a highly friction modified fluid
  • Provides compatibility with Chrysler ATF +3/+4, Honda Z1, Toyota Type T, Mitsubishi Diamond & Nissanmatic
  • Incorporates synthetics to improve transmission performance, reduce heat and wear
  • Blends with fluid for immediate effectiveness
  • 10oz bottle to treat one transmission
Fluid Friction Modifiers are used in some transmissions.
Just to make sure (about Friction Modifier)
 

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ATP AT-203 Synthetic Automatic Transmission Fluid Friction Modifier
Fluid Friction Modifiers are used in some transmissions.
Just to make sure (about Friction Modifier)
Friction Modifier endorsed by Jeepman? :oops:

So, adding friction modifiers to ATF+4 should be OK?

So you can buy Dextron or Mercon, add that stuff and now you have ATF+4?

Now, if you still have to but Dextron or Mercon + AT-203, why not just buy ATF+4?

Just to make sure (about Friction Modifier)
Seems like on srtforums they are talking about std. transmissions.
 

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I don't know, And you're right. I feel like he jumped to the new trans conclusion before he even looked at it. He said the pump sounded bad, and it was likely a worst-case scenario. Then suddenly after me saying I wasn't sure I wanted to replace the trans he told me he could drop the pan and take a closer look. Then he "had better news" and "wasn't as bad as he thought" and said the filter was a bit clogged and it was running better with the new filter. I don't know. He was very vague about everything after I said I didn't want to do the trans yet. The last thing he said was "maybe you'll get lucky and this will get you through winter" Still not feeling confident and not sure what to do with this. .
What you describe doesn’t convey this mechanic has very sequential & logical troubleshooting skills. It seems he troubleshoots off of assumptions and jumps to a lot of conclusions - which means an expensive and frustrating repair process for you.

I’d find someone else.
 

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Friction Modifier endorsed by Jeepman? :oops:

So, adding friction modifiers to ATF+4 should be OK?

So you can buy Dextron or Mercon, add that stuff and now you have ATF+4?

Now, if you still have to but Dextron or Mercon + AT-203, why not just buy ATF+4?



Seems like on srtforums they are talking about std. transmissions.
Some shops use the Dexron base, add the friction modifier, and send you out the door. I have heard of this on several occasions, including on here.
One example: Dexron III + Friction Modifier = ATF +4 ?
My 2001 Dodge Ram 2500 4x4 with Cummins I-6 diesel has the 47RE overdrive transmission specifying Chrysler's ATF +4 only. An independent diesel specialist shop drained, flushed and refilled with Dexron III / Mercon plus 20 oz ATP AT-203 synthetic friction modifier, claimed to provide equivalent performance as a highly friction modified ATF. The manager said Dexron III has better "lubricity" and is preferred based on his long field experience.
Chrysler automatic transmission fluids: 7176, ATF+3, ATF+4
Kristen Clark, marketing manager for Lubegard, wrote: “Lubegard has test data on its Lubegard Highly Friction Modified (HFM) ATF Supplement being used in Dexron III in place of Mopar ATF +3. Our packaging includes one of our tests — “Clutch Slip after engagement” — showing the torque curves on it. This compares Lubegard HFM ATF Supplement added to Dexron III vs. Chrysler's Mopar ATF+3. We have proof our products match the frictional characteristics of various other ATF fluids such as Mopar ATF + 4 as well.”
This is the information that circulates in the automatic transmission world.

Another common practice is transmission shops using Amsoil transmission fluid instead of licensed ATF+4. Customer beware.

Just sayin, not endorsin. :)
 

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Here's my little story,

I have a 96 Grand Voyager 3.3 with 41TE that your trans is based off of, it now has 242k miles on the clock. I bought this thing back in 2015 with 152k miles on it. The following year and 20k miles later I decided to replace the transmission filter and fluid for good measure. Now unfortunately I had some 3rd party shop (still a good one) do the job, but they used a generic synthetic trans fluid instead of proper ATF+4. Right after getting it back I could tell that the trans didn't feel quite right, it wasn't till after I started replacing the quarts it drops with ATF+4 that it went back to normal.

Last year and at around 232k miles the trans started to develop a whine noise. Eventually at 237k miles I started losing hydraulic pressure. This was in the fall so I ended up letting it sit over the winter (being lazy) even though it's typically the winter beast. At this point I was thinking it was toast.

This spring I finally got off my arse and decided to do trans filter and fluid replacement just to see if there was any difference. Keep in mind it had been 69861 miles since last trans filter change (I'm lazy and she's my beater). I did find a lot of fine metal in the pan, but that's normal wear and tear. There wasn't anything unusual for such an old and high mileage vehicle.

So how was it after the trans filter/fluid change? It's been completely normal since. I've only put 5k miles on it but it's been rock solid. I don't think there was any change in CVI as I was careful not to slip the clutch packs. Eventually when I'm over at my buddies again i'll pull the CVI #s.

I think I saw somewhere on this thread something about not changing filter until 150k miles? That's absolutely crazy. Sounds like marketing BS trying to push BS long service intervals. Same thing has been going on with oil change intervals. If your filter is clogged, it is restricting flow of the life blood that makes your transmission and engine work properly.

If you want your stuff to last, keep your filters and fluids fresh at reasonable intervals.

The other thing that's critical, DO NOT run anything other than ATF+4 in these transmissions. ATF+4 is like liquid gold compared to anything else for these units. We learned this hard lesson back way back in the 90s, are we re-learning it again? I don't care about friction modifiers. Run what this transmission was designed to run, and nothing else.
 
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