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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, this is my second post on this similar topic


rear lift 4 inch

So far for a lift, I have put AWD leaf spring shackles in the rear of the rear axle (approximately 3.5inches longer)
I'm working on fabricating lift blocks for the front leaf spring mounts.

I installed air shocks in the rear, 1inch longer compressed and 3 inch longer extended

Front lift. 3.75 inch

I'm installed 2005 Pacifica struts in the front, (about 3.5inch longer)

I had to get shorter sway bar end links, because Pacifica struts have a lower mount (bought Jeep 4-6in lift rear sway bar links)

A-arm ball joints are suffering from extreme angle, so sub frame lift is needed

I'm currently having four aluminum pucks made, 2 1/8in thick 2 3/4in round for FRONT SUB-FRAME lift.

I need to get fabricated a 2in spacer for the transmission mount to the subframe

finally, I will need to have fabricated two custom CV axles... The driver side will be extended an inch, and then the passenger side cut in two, with a carrier bearing and
CV Joint made in the middle. for extra clearence.
58389
58387
 

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Stephanies husband Dan (aka RoadRipper) has built a badass. he'll likely be along momentarily to tell you about those sway bar links....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Forgot to mention I plan on making a 2inch spacer for the transmission mount

And 2 inch spacers for the axle to leafsprings
 

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The low profile tires seem to be negating your lift. You need fatties. I'm running 245/65R17s and I bet my fenders are as high as yours with no lift on a 5th Gen.
 
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I posted in your other thread a while ago, about what I did. Anyway, I have Pacifica struts in my van now, along with 1 1/4" polyurethane strut spacers for even more lift and I don't have issues with the balljoints or the CV shafts. I took before and after measurements and only got 3" of lift on the front from where it started. In reality the old struts were quick struts with weak sagging springs lowering my van an inch from stock, so really only 2" of lift over stock. The Pacifica struts bottom spring mount is only 3/4" higher than the van, and my spacers made up the other 1 1/4". So unless you did something even more drastic than me, I highly doubt you have 3 3/4" of lift on the front. I already had a hard time cramming the struts with spacers in (control arms don't drop far enough to install easily). I have 2" thick aluminum spacers I tried to add, but they wouldn't fit unless I could compress the spring while installing (which is impossible). It came out being enough lift though, and now I need to try to lift the rear some more.
Before:
58418


After:
58419


I do have some shudder on acceleration now. Not sure if it's the increased angles of the CV joints, or more stress on worn motor mounts. I have all new motor mounts already, just have to install them (when I do my engine swap to a better condition engine). I know my tires are all off balance, and causing vibrations already. I have the advantage of the AWD drivetrain, which uses a short shaft on the passenger side with more angle to clear the control arm/crossmember. Lowering the front crossmember introduces other problems like the steering shaft length, brake lines, engine or transmission mounts, and losing some of the gained ground clearance. With only the Pacifica struts installed, that should be mild enough for everything to clear. On the 3rd gen handicapped van that I got my 2" aluminum spacers from, it was FWD and the passenger CV shaft still cleared when on the ground. If you lift it more with strut spacers, you could add the PTU unit and front AWD CV passenger shaft to get the steeper angle to clear. You wouldn't even need a good PTU unit, just the case, adapter, mounting brackets and carrier/bearings for the shaft to fit through/roll on. The pinion part of it could be removed, and a block-off plate made.

The first front antisway bar end links I tried (after seeing the stock ones were WAY too long) were about 9" long and from a 2001 Ford Focus. They were too short, causing the sway bar to push up on the outer tie rod end with steering cranked all the way one way. They would probably work for just the Pacifica strut without a spacer, but the threaded studs are smaller than the holes in the bar/strut and would need a collar to make the fit tighter. I ended up getting end links for a 2003 Ford Windstar by Moog, which are 10" long, greaseable, and use the same stud size. I only put one on so far, and it doesn't hit anything. I test fit them by installing, and then jacking the control arm or body to get both extremes of suspension travel and turn the steering lock-to-lock and observe for interference.

Pictured below: Far left is 2001 Ford Focus link, middle is 2003 Ford Windstar, far right is stock van link.

58420


Yes, I like to cut the studs shorter so I don't have exposed threads to rust up and make removal more difficult. I also ground flats on it to fit a wrench to ease removal. Always thinking ahead for serviceability.

For your rear lift, is there a reason you couldn't just use the AWD rear leaf springs? They are heavier/stiffer to keep the rear axle shafts of the AWD straight, and are the same springs used on cargo vans for heavier hauling. If the shorty vans use the same length springs as the long vans, this could be a great option.

I have half-leaf helper springs on the back of mine to try to lift it. It made it a little stiffer. For some reason one side of the rear is an inch higher than the other. I have some longer/heavier helper leaves to try, but I may also make some blocks to lift the rear and correct the uneven side-to-side height.
 

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I posted in your other thread a while ago, about what I did. Anyway, I have Pacifica struts in my van now, along with 1 1/4" polyurethane strut spacers for even more lift and I don't have issues with the balljoints or the CV shafts. I took before and after measurements and only got 3" of lift on the front from where it started. In reality the old struts were quick struts with weak sagging springs lowering my van an inch from stock, so really only 2" of lift over stock. The Pacifica struts bottom spring mount is only 3/4" higher than the van, and my spacers made up the other 1 1/4". So unless you did something even more drastic than me, I highly doubt you have 3 3/4" of lift on the front. I already had a hard time cramming the struts with spacers in (control arms don't drop far enough to install easily). I have 2" thick aluminum spacers I tried to add, but they wouldn't fit unless I could compress the spring while installing (which is impossible). It came out being enough lift though, and now I need to try to lift the rear some more.
Before:
View attachment 58418

After:
View attachment 58419

I do have some shudder on acceleration now. Not sure if it's the increased angles of the CV joints, or more stress on worn motor mounts. I have all new motor mounts already, just have to install them (when I do my engine swap to a better condition engine). I know my tires are all off balance, and causing vibrations already. I have the advantage of the AWD drivetrain, which uses a short shaft on the passenger side with more angle to clear the control arm/crossmember. Lowering the front crossmember introduces other problems like the steering shaft length, brake lines, engine or transmission mounts, and losing some of the gained ground clearance. With only the Pacifica struts installed, that should be mild enough for everything to clear. On the 3rd gen handicapped van that I got my 2" aluminum spacers from, it was FWD and the passenger CV shaft still cleared when on the ground. If you lift it more with strut spacers, you could add the PTU unit and front AWD CV passenger shaft to get the steeper angle to clear. You wouldn't even need a good PTU unit, just the case, adapter, mounting brackets and carrier/bearings for the shaft to fit through/roll on. The pinion part of it could be removed, and a block-off plate made.

The first front antisway bar end links I tried (after seeing the stock ones were WAY too long) were about 9" long and from a 2001 Ford Focus. They were too short, causing the sway bar to push up on the outer tie rod end with steering cranked all the way one way. They would probably work for just the Pacifica strut without a spacer, but the threaded studs are smaller than the holes in the bar/strut and would need a collar to make the fit tighter. I ended up getting end links for a 2003 Ford Windstar by Moog, which are 10" long, greaseable, and use the same stud size. I only put one on so far, and it doesn't hit anything. I test fit them by installing, and then jacking the control arm or body to get both extremes of suspension travel and turn the steering lock-to-lock and observe for interference.

Pictured below: Far left is 2001 Ford Focus link, middle is 2003 Ford Windstar, far right is stock van link.

View attachment 58420

Yes, I like to cut the studs shorter so I don't have exposed threads to rust up and make removal more difficult. I also ground flats on it to fit a wrench to ease removal. Always thinking ahead for serviceability.

For your rear lift, is there a reason you couldn't just use the AWD rear leaf springs? They are heavier/stiffer to keep the rear axle shafts of the AWD straight, and are the same springs used on cargo vans for heavier hauling. If the shorty vans use the same length springs as the long vans, this could be a great option.

I have half-leaf helper springs on the back of mine to try to lift it. It made it a little stiffer. For some reason one side of the rear is an inch higher than the other. I have some longer/heavier helper leaves to try, but I may also make some blocks to lift the rear and correct the uneven side-to-side height.
Road Ripper, I like what your doing with your minivan.
I just got a 2007 Grand Caravan C/V and I also purchased the polyurethane spacers to put under the front. I see where I might have a problem with the passenger CV but I hope that the mild lift I plan on won't make that too much of a concern.
I also have a 2003 Caravan C/V which has a higher rear end compared to the Grand, so I thought about swapping the spring packs. Unfortunately, the spring lengths are different between the two chassis so it can't be done. Now I'm looking into a Dayton add-a-leaf kit of which I've read good things about.
 

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Road Ripper, I like what your doing with your minivan.
Now I'm looking into a Dayton add-a-leaf kit of which I've read good things about.
The Dayton Add-A-Leaf Kit comes with mounting hardware for both a 3rd-gen and 4th-gen. With this said, there are 2X 1-inch spacer plates for the 3rd-gen usage. I could have nipped (ground) a chamfer into each to allow the brake mounting bracket to fit and allow an additional 1-inch lift above the already 1-1/2-inch lift it already provides. In the thread I had posted a pix of all the components in the kit. Not all parts are used as the kit covers a wide range of years.

Once all of your tweaking is done, the last tweak is to properly re-aim the headlamps. ;)
 
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