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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
06 caravan. thanks for response.

i want to exchange passenger tire front with rear driver side tire. i have two jack stands and two hydraulics jacks.

In the past I have jacked up back and front tires simultaneously but on same side without a problem

can i jack l up car on passenger front side, while simultaneously jacking up rear driver side, with belief that the car will stay balanced while exchanging tires?
If not what do you suggest?

I won't jack under the rails their rusted out.
 

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62466


Use both jacks, no jack stand.

Since your vehicle have some rust, lift the front tire, remove it, then lower the vehicle to the normal resting height.

Go to the next tire. Using the other jack, remove the tire, install the other tire then move on to the front and install the tire you just removed from the rear.

Easy!
 

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Make sure your wheels, on the ground, are well chocked and you might want to back off the lugnuts a quarter turn +/_ while the wheels, being worked on, are on the ground. That's to prevent movement to the vehicle while on the jacks. Do final tightening after lowering.

Assumption: You are working on a basically level surface.

Using a jack stand on the front, while keeping the jack in place, but lowered some to allow contact with the jack stand, will give you extra stability. You have the frame and the cradle bolt to work with.

Lowering, like LEVY mentioned, will give a more stable situation with regard to the wheels on the ground working for you.
 

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Sorry, I wouldn't recommend this. Too dangerous. Buy a second set of jack stands and a cross beam to install on your floor jack. (If it's a 3 ton floor jack) You would chalk both rear tires. Jack up the front two tires first, placing the jack stands on the main unibody frame. Use the cross beam, fully extended outward, to jack up the rear wheels at the same time under the rear axle beam. You can place jack stands on the front leaf spring bracket or under the cross beam, just outside of the shock mount.

Steel Floor Jack Cross Beam (harborfreight.com)
 

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Sorry, I wouldn't recommend this. Too dangerous. Buy a second set of jack stands and a cross beam to install on your floor jack. (If it's a 3 ton floor jack) You would chalk both rear tires. Jack up the front two tires first, placing the jack stands on the main unibody frame. Use the cross beam, fully extended outward, to jack up the rear wheels at the same time under the rear axle beam. You can place jack stands on the front leaf spring bracket or under the cross beam, just outside of the shock mount.

Steel Floor Jack Cross Beam (harborfreight.com)
I would jack up the front end put the jack stands so the front is off the ground and jack up the back side


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You guys are making it too complicating.

62476


Nothing wrong with that, as long as the vehicle is in a flat, level surface, you can safely do it.
 

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First, if your tires are wearing evenly, I'd just rotate the tires front to back, leaving them on the same side, which is what I did. Make life simple for yourself.

Second, there is no second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
View attachment 62466

Use both jacks, no jack stand.

Since your vehicle have some rust, lift the front tire, remove it, then lower the vehicle to the normal resting height.

Go to the next tire. Using the other jack, remove the tire, install the other tire then move on to the front and install the tire you just removed from the rear.

Easy!
when you saying "normal" does that mean about 4to 6 inches off the ground? thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
First, if your tires are wearing evenly, I'd just rotate the tires front to back, leaving them on the same side, which is what I did. Make life simple for yourself.

Second, there is no second.
right that is what i normally do also but can't in this situation. thanks
 

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First, if your tires are wearing evenly, I'd just rotate the tires front to back, leaving them on the same side, which is what I did. Make life simple for yourself.

Second, there is no second.
Most tire manufacturers prefer rotating tires on the same side only to prevent change of tire rotating direction, even with non directional tires. It is safer.
 

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I agree with the folks above. Every manual that I've read said that radial tires are supposed to be rotated straight front to back. The old bias ply tires were the ones that you were supposed to swap sides when rotated.
 

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As long as the parking brake works. Since one front wheel will be off the ground, PARK is useless because of the differential. The wheels on the ground should be chocked forward and back, and parking brake set (ideally). Otherwise do one end of van at a time, and see if you can find a 3rd wheel to use temporarily to set the van down on. The 5 on 4 1/2 bolt pattern is pretty common, so even a spare from a different car may work.

Twisting the body like that isn't a good idea sometimes. We had a 2nd gen van that cracked the windshield from jacking one front corner up too high.
 

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...Every manual that I've read said that radial tires are supposed to be rotated straight front to back...
What manuals are you reading?

The manuals for these minivans show the "forward-cross" rotation pattern, for example:
62480

62481

62482
 
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What manuals are you reading?

The manuals for these minivans show the "forward-cross" rotation pattern, for example:
View attachment 62480
View attachment 62481
View attachment 62482
OK, granted they were mostly for slightly older vehicles, but every other manual that I've bothered to read said to go straight font to back. Some of them even specifically said NOT to change the rotation direction of radial tires.

It seems to be acceptable (if not preferable) with the tire manufacturers to go straight front to back, and it makes the most sense to me to do it that way, so that's the way I plan to continue to do it.;)
 

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Guess these vans won't make good off road vehicles if one is worried about twisting across the diagonal, considering how short that diagonal is based on the hoist points.

Just drive the two wheels, not being worked on, up on ramps. Unload the sacks of potatoes first. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
As long as the parking brake works. Since one front wheel will be off the ground, PARK is useless because of the differential. The wheels on the ground should be chocked forward and back, and parking brake set (ideally). Otherwise do one end of van at a time, and see if you can find a 3rd wheel to use temporarily to set the van down on. The 5 on 4 1/2 bolt pattern is pretty common, so even a spare from a different car may work.

Twisting the body like that isn't a good idea sometimes. We had a 2nd gen van that cracked the windshield from jacking one front corner up too high.
I always wondered about putting the wheel down on a spare, thought it might damage the rim of the spare tire. wife would say "what the heck"
btw--i don't having a parking break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hence this:
levy when you say lower the tire to resting, place do you mean: lower the wheel to the point as though the tire was on the wheel, which would be about 4 inches? thanks for response.
 
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