The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

81 - 100 of 102 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #81
Coolant Change

I did 2 complete drain and fills with distilled water. Thanks to that awesome little bleeder screw on the thermostat housing, purging the air in the system is pretty easy. I invested in a Lisle spill proof funnel. Worth every penny! No balancing of a funnel and worrying that it will fall into the engine bay and soak everything. Even after 2 complete flushes, there is a very slight pink tinge to the fluid.

I had planned on doing the trans pan drop and filter replacement today, but got too late a start. I did the rear brakes; one station while the cooling system cooled between flushes. I'll put the brake job in the next post.

59995



59997



This clamp was, of course, flipped around to the inaccessible side, so it took some contortionist movements to get it spun around so that I could get the channel locks on it.

59998


Love this little bleeder screw! The spill-free funnel mounts much higher than all other cooling system parts, so gravity helps purge the system.

59999




60000


I had to tape down the hood open sensor to run the van with the hood up.

60001


Watching the temp gauge like a hawk. Love the EVIC!

60002


Final fill of concentrated coolant. I added both jugs - about 8L. Then topped up with a similar amount of distilled water. Since I didn't have my evac pump, I just flushed out the overflow tank with the lower hose removed until it ran clear. It drains down to a good level whereby you can just add concentrated coolant until the MAX line. I haven't tested the coolant yet with my tester, but will do that tomorrow. I expect I'll have to do a little tweaking.

60003
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #82 (Edited)
Rear Brakes

My front brakes have completely smoothed out. Absolutely smooth even braking from 120 km/h. There is great pad life left and the rotors have seemingly 'resurfaced themselves'. I think the van sat for a while and it just took some time and braking to clean everything all up. Because of this, I decided to have a close look at the rear rotors. They have a little bit of scoring but not bad. The pads were about 2 mm from metal on metal. One outer pad was completely frozen in the clips. It took a hammer and large screw driver to remove it. I decided to leave the rotors and see how they worked out. Again, completely smooth on the highway home with the new pads.

60004


Nasty pad!

60005


All the clips were replaced with new stainless steel ones, but I filed out the clip channels first. Always good to do so that the new clips actually seat and don't bind up the pads. The clips were treated with ceramic brake lube on both sides before installation. I still had to grind the pad tabs a bit as they were a little tight. I really like the way Chrysler designed the pad retaining system. It's simple yet effective and easy to install the pads.

60006



60007


Who needs to buy a Mopar "special tool"? A grinder wrench works prefectly! Turning in the piston. Again, I give Chrysler A+ for the design. No clamps or piston compressor needed. A few quick turns and the caliper slides right over the pads.

60008



60009


The above was the driver's side. Pics below are the passenger side. Check out that pad thickness! Oh, and on both sides, the caliper sliders were free and buttery smooth. No need to even remove, clean and re-grease them. Boots were perfect. Bonus!

60010


60011
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #83
I found folder in the back of the Super Console. It contained many service records. It looks as though this van might have been owned by a snowbird. There were a few oil changes over the years which happened in Florida during the winter months. The owner was, as suspected, very up the maintenance. Oil changes average about 7000 - 8000 kms. It looks like the coolant and transmission had been left alone. So, I'm hoping that the factory fill of coolant was OAT. This is what the service department told me after I gave them my VIN. I dug into my manual and discovered that a transmission fluid change is supposed to occur at 192000 kms. So, I'll a little ahead of the game. I plan to do the pan drop, filter and fluid replacement after school on Tuesday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #84
Polish and acrylic sealant

I had a few hours this afternoon, so I polished the van and applied my Klasse Sealant Glaze. Great stuff. Super durable and long-lasting. The chrome just pops!

60037



60038



60039


60040



60041
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
Refinished the door sills.

The door sills had the typical scratches so decided to repaint them and apply 3M ppf. I ordered a color match spray bomb from our local APM. They did an amazing job matching the paint. I used my standard process of: degreasing, wet sanding, degreasing, 3 coats grey primer, wet sand, dry, 3 costs of paint. I did the drivers sill about a week ago, then applied the ppf today. In a about a week, I'll put the ppf on the passenger side, which was painted today.

60119


60120


60124
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Refinished the door sills.

The door sills had the typical scratches so decided to repaint them and apply 3M ppf. I ordered a color match spray bomb from our local APM. They did an amazing job matching the paint. I used my standard process of: degreasing, wet sanding, degreasing, 3 coats grey primer, wet sand, dry, 3 costs of paint. I did the drivers sill about a week ago, then applied the ppf today. In a about a week, I'll put the ppf on the passenger side, which was painted today.

View attachment 60119

View attachment 60120
Looks Great
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #87
Looks Great
Thanks! I'm really happy with the way they turned out. I've used this paint before and it's extremely durable. So, with the ppf, it should hold up really well.
 

·
--UNKNOWN MEMBER--
Joined
·
13,039 Posts
Using distilled water for a cooling system flush is just a waste of money.

Why? Because coolant already have a lot of minerals, using tap water and a good draing after that should be ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #89
Using distilled water for a cooling system flush is just a waste of money.

Why? Because coolant already have a lot of minerals, using tap water and a good draing after that should be ok.
Not when you have hard well water like we do. Hard water minerals can cause scale and consume corrosion inhibitors in the coolant chemistry. I've always used distilled and my cooling systems are spotless when I've replaced thermostats for example. Also, I'm sure the minerals that are added in the coolant formula are ones that prevent corrosion, not cause corrosion. I'm more than ok with spending $10.00 for 3 flushes with distilled water.
 
  • Like
Reactions: georgef

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Thanks for the pics!

You were in there, so I would have done the rotors also. The back ones do not look good looking at their surface.
When you reset the back pistons make sure it sits 'horizontaly', otherwise the middle notch on the back of the inner brake pad will not line up with one of the indentions of the piston. This keeps the piston from turning during operation and allow the pad to sit flush to the piston.

notch.png



lineup.png



If this were factory coolant on a 2013+, it would be of pink/violet color ... with Chrysler MS-12106 approval.
Pre 2013 was of a red color...and meet Chrysler MS-9769 approval.

I do not want to start a transmission fluid change discussion. But if you do decide to do this regularily, there is no such thing as 'too early'.
Every 60k miles including filter is what maintenance schedule says for vehicles used in 'harsh environment' - I stickt to that :)
Use ATF+4 with Chrysler MS-9602 approval for that. I like to even stick with genuine mopar fluids all around.

Happy wrenching!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
Thanks for the pics!

You were in there, so I would have done the rotors also. The back ones do not look good looking at their surface.
When you reset the back pistons make sure it sits 'horizontaly', otherwise the middle notch on the back of the inner brake pad will not line up with one of the indentions of the piston. This keeps the piston from turning during operation and allow the pad to sit flush to the piston.

View attachment 60128


View attachment 60127


If this were factory coolant on a 2013+, it would be of pink/violet color ... with Chrysler MS-12106 approval.
Pre 2013 was of a red color...and meet Chrysler MS-9769 approval.

I do not want to start a transmission fluid change discussion. But if you do decide to do this regularily, there is no such thing as 'too early'.
Every 60k miles including filter is what maintenance schedule says for vehicles used in 'harsh environment' - I stickt to that :)
Use ATF+4 with Chrysler MS-9602 approval for that. I like to even stick with genuine mopar fluids all around.

Happy wrenching!
Thanks for the reply! Yeah, I had read about having the little nub in one of the triangular cut outs in the caliper piston. The center nub seemed too low on the pad to go into the slot. I'll likely take it apart and install the new rotors before long anyway. The rotor has smoothed out visually a bit and the braking is very silky (for lack of a better term). Do you know if the caliper screw has a tendency to move outward, creating more pressure on the pad if the nub is not in the slot. Or, if the caliper screw backs off and makes the pads loose? Until I get in there and change the rotors out, I'll jack up the van and check the piston/pad contact, spin the wheels etc. I wouldn't say that it took a lot of force to spin the piston in. It turned very smoothly but required some pressure. I wonder how the piston screws self adjust as the lining wears if they are locked into the nub. The pads on the rear of my van were down to a few mm of lining and the piston screw was way out. It took many turns to bring the screw back enough to easily slide the caliper assembly over the new pads. I guess I don't fully understand how the system works if the piston screw needs to be retained in one of its slots. From what I could see, the piston was sitting flat on the pad shims. Maybe I'm wrong and it's not a 'self-adjusting' system, and adjustments need to be made manually by removing the caliper, adjusting and reinstalling as part of routine maintenance.

The coolant appeared a reddish-pink in my bucket. I really should have taken a pic of it. If I were doing it again, I would have bought the Mopar concentrated coolant with the MS-12106 approval spec. For now, I'll be doing one more drain and fill with the OAT coolant I have. I am pretty certain now that what was in there was OAT and I think this because I've been told so by 3 dealers. I gave my VIN, asked them to look it up and asked what coolant was in there. I did not ask, "Is it HOAT or OAT?". Also, with a manufacture date actually in 2013, I feel more confident.

I am a big advocate of changing the ATF regularly and always use ATF+4. Unfortunately, due to the border closing, I don't have access to my cheap Walmart SuperTech ATF+4 @ $4.29 a bottle. But, for $8.95 Canadian, I get Transmax ATF+4. On my 2006 Grand Caravan, I changed it quite regularly. I picked up a pan with drain for my T&C, just like I did for my '06. I've already sucked out and refilled about 4L of ATF+4. When I first test drove the van and started it from cold in the dealer lot, it would engage a little roughly into "D". Since swapping out the 4L of ATF, engagement has been super smooth. Not sure if it's a coincidence or if several driving cycles improved things. What are your thoughts on a relearn after a pan drop, filter change and top up? I'm pretty sure that my trans has - over time - adapted to my driving style. If it shifts well, would I be okay just driving the van and allowing it to relearn on its own?

With regard to doing a fluid change, I believe that introducing fluid slowly over a period of time is the best approach. I've run for a couple of weeks now on the 4L swapped out and the transmission works beautifully. I will drop the pan, swap in a new filter and replace with the same amount of fluid drained (once it's cooled to the same temp as my bottles), then bring the trans up to temp and test the level. I have scored my oil dipstick on the back based upon the charts and at 180F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #92 (Edited)
Rust Proofing (rear quarter panels, wheelhouse and dogleg areas)

Was please to see that nothing has changed from the 4th Gen. to 5th Gen. vans in terms of construction at the back. Like with my '06, I popped out the rear speakers and got great access to the wheelhouse, dogleg and rear panel section. This whole jobs takes less than a hour and is, IMO, a very worthwhile process. I had worried about the rustproofing products messing with the body seam sealer, but years of doing this on my 2006 van proved that it has no adverse effect.

The panel pops out easily with my plastic tool.

60134


Four little screws and the speaker pops out.

60135


60136


I use three products. First I go with Rust Check red, spraying all areas that can be reached. And, no, I don't put this ATF in my Chrysler transmission. It's just an old bottle I had on the shelf.

60137


Then, I use my transmission funnel and push it over the wheel well above the dogleg area and aft of the wheel well into the rear quarter area. Finally, I use the thicker Rust Check Coat and Protect (green). The red stuff has penetrated all the seams, then the thicker stuff is washed down into the seams for a longer lasting protection.

60138


I know the product gets everywhere as it drips out in front of the wheel and all the way to the back of the van.

60139


60140


It also drips out all along the rocker toward the front of the van.

60141


ATF running out from in front of and behind the wheel.

60144



Here's a random pic of the rear axle.

60142
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,498 Posts
I fear that many rustproofers, especially Dealerships, don't get any product above the wheel wells. Krown drills a hole in the back of the sliding door opening to get in there. Some say no drilling is required, there's enough drain holes to do the job. That's probably true for the doors and hatch, but not for the rear wheel wells or rocker panels.

Isn't that demineralized, not distilled, water I saw you using for your coolant change? :)

There's a guy, about 20 minutes away, that does rustproofing using Fluid Film. I arranged a deal with him to do my Grandsons van. $40.00 for the installation, the Customer provides the Fluid Film. It takes about half a gallon of product and you get the rest of the can back,

I had a look at the van on Friday. It's well covered with Fluid Film, including in the engine bay area. Looks good. I think I'm impressed.

That guy is quite a character. He has used the ProChem product but was was highly critical of it compared to Fluid Film. One thing he pointed out was that ProChem burns very easily. He then proceeded to dip his finger in some Fluid Film and then put a lighter under it. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 06DGC

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
My 51 year old Mercedes is also flooded with Fluid Film... 😋
Used Perma Film for undercoating...car marks its territory for some years after this treatment ...:oops:

B05_Alex230-8_Hohlraumkonservierung.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: 06DGC

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #95 (Edited)
I fear that many rustproofers, especially Dealerships, don't get any product above the wheel wells. Krown drills a hole in the back of the sliding door opening to get in there. Some say no drilling is required, there's enough drain holes to do the job. That's probably true for the doors and hatch, but not for the rear wheel wells or rocker panels.

Isn't that demineralized, not distilled, water I saw you using for your coolant change? :)

There's a guy, about 20 minutes away, that does rustproofing using Fluid Film. I arranged a deal with him to do my Grandsons van. $40.00 for the installation, the Customer provides the Fluid Film. It takes about half a gallon of product and you get the rest of the can back,

I had a look at the van on Friday. It's well covered with Fluid Film, including in the engine bay area. Looks good. I think I'm impressed.

That guy is quite a character. He has used the ProChem product but was was highly critical of it compared to Fluid Film. One thing he pointed out was that ProChem burns very easily. He then proceeded to dip his finger in some Fluid Film and then put a lighter under it. :)
I'm convinced that, given enough time, most vehicles can be thoroughly rustproofed without drilling. It definitely seems to be the case for these vans. ATF dumped on top of the wheel well will travel down to the dogleg area and run down the rocker to at least the "B" pillar (see pic #8). It's dripping out all along the rocker pinch weld. It will also make its way back toward and under the tail lights (see pic # 6 - 7). If a person is willing to do some poking around, he/she can find access points. The outfits like Rust Check and Krown claim that they have structural diagrams of all cars, and they may, but I don't believe for 1 second that they actually use them. I can understand that as it would take a lot longer to do the job without drilling. I'm not even really opposed to drilling, but would prefer not to.

I used distilled water in my flush and re-fill procedure. I may have mistakenly said de-mineralized water. I did some more research after Levy's post. There's a lot of contradictory info on the net. Some claim that distilled water results in metal ion molecules being sucked from system metals. Others say that since it's distilled it will not draw out ions. Some say to use tap water, others a vehemently opposed. Another opinion was that de-ionized water should be used and then that was directly contradicted, saying that it will suck more ions in an attempt tp balance the water chemistry. The most credible article I read (of course I liked this one since I used distilled, lol) said that you want distilled or demineralized water and that the abundant corrosion additives in antifreeze would prevent any corrosion anyway.

I used ProForm undercoating. It is an oil-based product. I thinned it down with ATF, or motor oil, can't recall, for inner panels, subframes and unibody rails etc, then applied it un-thinned on the underneath. I used it largely because it was free and available in abundance in our school shop. I would prefer Fluid Film. I can say, though, that Rust Check Coat and Protect is an excellent underbody coating. It is tenacious as ****, once all the solvents gas out of it. I stopped putting it on the outside bottoms of my doors because it was a bear to remove in the spring. I had to use a strong solvent and risked dulling the paint as it had fine sand embedded in it. I think it must contain some wax above and beyond the oil base.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #96
My 51 year old Mercedes is also flooded with Fluid Film... 😋
Used Perma Film for undercoating...car marks its territory for some years after this treatment ...:oops:

View attachment 60148
Beautiful! That literally warms the cockles of my heart, seeing that. A 51 year old car, looking like it just rolled off the showroom floor. Good on you! Imagine if everyone took the time to do this. With proper maintenance, cars would routinely go 1000000 kilometers. Of course, the car manufacturers wouldn't appreciate that. Lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #97 (Edited)
AppCar diagFCA

My OBD2 AppCar compatible dongle arrived today. I picked up a membership. Had some great fun playing around with it. I ran some "routines" for some things like the power sliding doors and liftgate. I ran scans on all the modules and only came up with one DTC. It was for a mismatched country code Radio Sirius membership.

After some searching, I found what I was looking for. The 62TE transmission quick-learn. I'm hoping to do my pan drop, filter replacement and pan (with drain bolt) install and fluid top up. If it runs perfectly, I may not do the quick-learn. It has been running so smoothly since I sucked out and replaced 4L of ATF+4.

Loading database

60167


Re-learn. I may invest in the Volvo Vida Dice as apparently it can check for the latest flashes for the computers. I understand that that's the first thing Chrysler/Dodge dealers do after a fluid change. It would be nice to know of I have the latest software flash for the transmission. Maybe I'll just appeal to acgallex for more guidance. Maybe the quick-learn will be enough.

60168
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hello folks.

I was a long time member of the site when I owned a 2006 GC. I learned a ton from members here and did a lot of my own work. I'm a major car-guy at heart, do all of my own repairs, maintenance, welding (not great at it) as well as car painting (I have a cross draft spray booth in one side of my garage). My most recent project was a 2ZR (1.8 low mileage Corolla engine) dropped into my 2006 Yaris RS and then I installed a turbo kit, DIY water/methanol injection and HSD coilover installation. I did everything including the wiring and turbo piping modifications, installed a thermostatically controlled trans cooler, numerous gauges (boost, oil pressure, oil temp trans temp, AFR wideband etc, as well as a complete sound system with 7" Android touch screen with Torque Pro OBD2 engine monitoring and diagnostics). I did a full repaint of the car about 2 years ago If you're at all interested, you can check it out here:

Instagram

Anyway, enough about that...
That Yaris! (Along with an ATC90 is one of my dream vehicles.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #99 (Edited)
Trans pan drop, filter replacement and refill...

The pan came off very easily thankfully. Getting the pan off of my 2ZR engine that I swapped into my Yaris was an absolute nightmare in comparison.

The pan from the T&C was very clean with only a small bit of metallic paste on the magnet. The fluid actually looked great for 93000 miles. I let the van and bottles of ATF+4 reach a similar temperature in the shop for several hours. I didn't measure the number of liters, but rather just drained into a bucket and marked the level. Then I cleaned the bucket thoroughly and poured the same amount of fresh ATF into the bucket. I think it took close to 6L as I let it drain for a good hour or more as I wanted a much out and as little on the mating surface as possible.

I used Permatex Ultra Black RTV. I've used it before on transmission pans with success. I applied about 3/16" bead on the pan flange, put the pan on and hand tightened the bolts. Maybe 1/2 later I snugged up the bolts. I gave the RTV 2 hours and then dumped in the fluid. No leaks so far after a good 40 - 50 kms; bolts and flange are dry. I placed cardboard under the car and will check in the am.

Between this pan drop and earlier removal and replacement of 4 L of ATF, I've swapped out about 10L. I have another 4L of ATF+4, so in a week or so, I'll drain that and refill. Then, I should be good for a while. I haven't done the transmission re-learn as the shifting is perfectly smooth.

60214


60215


60216


60217


60218


60219
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Discussion Starter #100
No oil drips on the cardboard I put under the van last night. I got lucky with the short 2 hour RTV cure time. It's definitely cured now! Connected AppCar diagFCA and took at level check at 140F. It was right around 30mm from the bottom of the oil dipstick. Will run the trans up to 180 later today and recheck. I'm guessing I might add 1/4L or so. Pics to follow...
 
81 - 100 of 102 Posts
Top