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2014 Chrysler T&C Went through a car wash the other day and forgot to check the rear windows. The 430-RBZ screen lit up solid white for a moment. Now it's dead. No response at all. Reverse camera, clock, radio, bluetooth hands free, all dead. Since the amp is located in the back is it possible that got wet and damaged? Really don't want to have to replace radio, etc., etc. if it's only the amplifier. Fuses are all good.

Do you think the engineers designed it that way? LOL!

Chris
 

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2013 Dodge Grand Caravan
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Amp got wet. Disconnect it and check fuses (M10,M12) again before trying to turn the radio on. There's a chance it fried just the amp, but you need to do this to see.
 
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1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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How hard is it to pull? If you could get it out easily, you'd want to rinse it with distilled water to absorb any chemicals or salts, then rinse with 91% isopropyl alcohol to absorb the distilled water left on it, then bake in a food dehydrator for a day. You could also, very carefully, bake the component in an oven at the lowest setting, 150°F to 170°F maximum, for a day to evaporate any moisture left inside. You want to periodically crack the oven open to let fresh, dry air in if you go the oven route. 170° is the temperature that the worst plastics that have no business being in a car begin to melt, ABS plastic normally used in a car should be safe to 200° before you risk deformation.

If it's already broken, what have you got to lose🤷
 
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Good idea! We will consider doing that. Identifying all the faulty parts is the challenge. Did the shorted Amplifier take out the radio? Camera system? Bluetooth?

So many unanswered questions.

Chris
 

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Disconnect the amp. Then disconnect one of the battery cables, with that cable touch the other cable (nothing bad will happen) a couple of times. Connect the battery and you should be good to go.

If it works, follow Edy's suggestions, I just would use a hair drier to dry the amp's guts.
 

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3rd Gen Plebeian
1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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The hair dryer, bags of desiccant, or a trip through a dehydrator/oven will remedy water that is in there, similar to the horribly ineffective method of leaving your wet phone in a bag of rice.

What happens with phones, that should apply to an amplifier, is that after the moisture is gone, corrosion will continue to spread. Particularly with there being soaps and chemicals in the carwash. Distilled water isn't electrically conductive(neither is isopropyl alcohol), there must be other things dissolved into water to make it conductive. This junk gets left on the PCB when the water evaporates. So if you rinse or rinse and scrub with distilled water, you dissolve the contaminant chemicals off of the board. Alcohol readily combines with distilled water, and the mixture they form has a lower boiling point than water, so the distilled water/alcohol mixture will evaporate much faster than water alone. The mixture is virtually non-conductive.

I don't know if it matters for assembled circuit boards, but I used to work in maintenance for an electronic component distributor. I had to certify ESD and MSL equipment. A lot of surface mount components in electronics absorb water from the air, enough so that they will pop like a popcorn kernel from heat when being soldered to a PCB in a solder reflow oven. These parts would have to be baked in an ultralow humidity oven if they got exposed to atmosphere for more than 30 minutes, and were stored in moisture barrier bags with desiccant inside. I would worry that certain IC chips on a PCB would absorb a lot of moisture when exposed to liquid water, and would have to be brought back to ambient humidity by applying dry, heated air. You will often see ratings on assembled electrical equipment, for example: Storage 100°C at 95%RH, In Use 75°C at 50%RH. This leads me to believe that components are still hydroscopic after assembly and that this can effect the life or operation of the equipment.
 
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What happens with phones, that should apply to an amplifier, is that after the moisture is gone, corrosion will continue to spread. Particularly with there being soaps and chemicals in the carwash. Distilled water isn't electrically conductive(neither is isopropyl alcohol), there must be other things dissolved into water to make it conductive. . Alcohol readily combines with distilled water, and the mixture they form has a lower boiling point than water, so the distilled water/alcohol mixture will evaporate much faster than water alone. The mixture is virtually non-conductive.

Even distilled water has some minerals, but it is a lot better than tap water.
 

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How hard is it to pull? If you could get it out easily, you'd want to rinse it with distilled water to absorb any chemicals or salts, then rinse with 91% isopropyl alcohol to absorb the distilled water left on it, then bake in a food dehydrator for a day. You could also, very carefully, bake the component in an oven at the lowest setting, 150°F to 170°F maximum, for a day to evaporate any moisture left inside. You want to periodically crack the oven open to let fresh, dry air in if you go the oven route. 170° is the temperature that the worst plastics that have no business being in a car begin to melt, ABS plastic normally used in a car should be safe to 200° before you risk deformation.

If it's already broken, what have you got to lose🤷
Okay, hold on a second. Only the 10 speaker sound system has the amp and it sits in the rear quarter panel behind the subwoofer. The 4 and 6 speaker systems only have the radio, no external amp. The amp doesn't fry the radio (I have tried many things, these amps are about as solid and un-destroyable as they get).

FIRST, check the relay or fuse for the radio, it will be in the engine bay. Since you lost all radio operation features, I think it's a power issue for the radio itself. Does the button backlights turn on when you turn on your headlights? Check that first before you start removing panels.

If that doesn't work, it's possible the radio just went. It does happen to these, and it sucks.

If you insist to check the amp, if you have the 10 speaker infinity sound system (which has the 506 watt amp):

It's really not hard at all to remove. You open the gate, remove the upper plastic piece with the center seat belt, held in by 2 cross screws on either side, and the rest clips into the roof, just pull down.

Then, remove the plastic piece that the tailgate latch sits on, grab it, pry it towards the roof, it slides into the side panels.

(driver side) Remove the speaker bolster, 4 clips towards the front of the van, pull it straight back, then slide it towards the front. Remove the 2 screws you see.

Use a trim removal tool, 2 Christmas tree plastic clips holds the upper D-pillar trim, they will be above the motor for the vent window. Then grab a flat head and pry out the bottom of that plastic piece (above the jack)

Then remove that, undo the 21? mm bolt that holds the seatbelt, remove the cross screw that was revealed when the upper D-pillar trim was removed, look by the window where it screws to the metal frame.

Then, remove the driver side sliding door trim piece on the floor, it pry it up from the cabin side and slide it a bit outwards, then it lifts free.

The rest of the rear quarter panel trim is held in by clips, gently pull towards the other side of the van. The subwoofer has 2 10 mm bolts holding it in place and a 6 way connector, then pivot the top of the sub towards the front to free the top, and lift straight up to free the bottom.

You can do this without removing the power cables/VES/inverter cables that you see on that panel by the sliding door, just be careful.

The amp is right there, it's held in by 3 10mm screws, and 2 large connectors.
 

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Okay, hold on a second. Only the 10 speaker sound system has the amp and it sits in the rear quarter panel behind the subwoofer. The 4 and 6 speaker systems only have the radio, no external amp. The amp doesn't fry the radio (I have tried many things, these amps are about as solid and un-destroyable as they get).

FIRST, check the relay or fuse for the radio, it will be in the engine bay. Since you lost all radio operation features, I think it's a power issue for the radio itself. Does the button backlights turn on when you turn on your headlights? Check that first before you start removing panels.

If that doesn't work, it's possible the radio just went. It does happen to these, and it sucks.

If you insist to check the amp, if you have the 10 speaker infinity sound system (which has the 506 watt amp):

It's really not hard at all to remove. You open the gate, remove the upper plastic piece with the center seat belt, held in by 2 cross screws on either side, and the rest clips into the roof, just pull down.

Then, remove the plastic piece that the tailgate latch sits on, grab it, pry it towards the roof, it slides into the side panels.

(driver side) Remove the speaker bolster, 4 clips towards the front of the van, pull it straight back, then slide it towards the front. Remove the 2 screws you see.

Use a trim removal tool, 2 Christmas tree plastic clips holds the upper D-pillar trim, they will be above the motor for the vent window. Then grab a flat head and pry out the bottom of that plastic piece (above the jack)

Then remove that, undo the 21? mm bolt that holds the seatbelt, remove the cross screw that was revealed when the upper D-pillar trim was removed, look by the window where it screws to the metal frame.

Then, remove the driver side sliding door trim piece on the floor, it pry it up from the cabin side and slide it a bit outwards, then it lifts free.

The rest of the rear quarter panel trim is held in by clips, gently pull towards the other side of the van. The subwoofer has 2 10 mm bolts holding it in place and a 6 way connector, then pivot the top of the sub towards the front to free the top, and lift straight up to free the bottom.

You can do this without removing the power cables/VES/inverter cables that you see on that panel by the sliding door, just be careful.

The amp is right there, it's held in by 3 10mm screws, and 2 large connectors.
Thank You! Great Information. I will let everyone know how it went after the operation is performed.

Chris
 
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