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Not sure I'd fool around with an AGM unless the vehicle came with one - they have a different charging regimen than the flooded cell that comes standard.
Notice also that Chrysler don't cheap out on the OEM battery, using a big Group 27, where they could have gotten away easily with the smaller group 24.
My 2015 built in 2014, still starts just fine stored outside in our frigid Canadian winters and I don't use a block heater - never have.
My '97 Gen 3 had a 12 year old battery and I only replaced it because a computerized tester showed it was down to 30%, but that big battery, also a Group 27 still started just fine at -30Deg C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
My new Kirkland battery says "Made in China for Costco". That's not just any battery and hopefully better than made in Brazil for Chrysler. :)
 
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My new Kirkland battery says "Made in China for Costco". That's not just any battery and hopefully better than made in Brazil for Chrysler. :)
Brazil make parts for many car manufacturers, including european cars, like Volkswagen and others.

Brazilian parts are cheaper than Mexican parts, but not necessarily less quality.
 

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2014 Town and Country 109,000 miles original battery.
Batteries in the good old days. Back in the seventies if you bought a battery showing 36 months you were lucky if it got 36 months. Before that you were lucky if the OEM battery lasted 36 months. Just in time when the three year loan was paid on your new car. Time to trade.
When the Diehard battery came out it’s selling point was five years, cause most batteries didn’t last five years.
 

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2009 Chrysler Town and Country
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2014 Town and Country 109,000 miles original battery.
Batteries in the good old days. Back in the seventies if you bought a battery showing 36 months you were lucky if it got 36 months. Before that you were lucky if the OEM battery lasted 36 months. Just in time when the three year loan was paid on your new car. Time to trade.
When the Diehard battery came out it’s selling point was five years, cause most batteries didn’t last five years.
I don't know about that back in the seventies i had a battery made by Willard I had that battery 7 or 8 yrs in several different cars . It was well known at that time to be a premium battery .

I bought them until i couldn't find them anymore . I think it was bought out buy Interstate or some other battery company. Diehard was junk from the very start .

Most batteries back in that era needed maintenance like anything else if you don't maintain it , it just don't last as long .

Also all it takes is for a battery to overheat just once over charge due to a faulty charging system . Or freeze due not being fully charged That will Shorten the battery life tremendously.

That will put you on borrowed time
 

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2012 Town & Country
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My factory 2013 battery lasted until May of 2018 (≈ 6 years), it failed while camping 750 miles away from home, my only option was to buy a "higher end" Interstate battery (still only 2.5 year warranty), with tax it cost me $189.18 and I did the replacement. I know I would not have payed that much if I had replaced it while at home. I had no warning that the battery was about to fail, 750 miles of highway driving, then one day of battery draining while camping, battery charger never fell below 5 amps and the van would not start. It will be interesting to see how long a "higher end" battery will last.
 

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Expecting any battery to last more than 5 years is courting disaster. Simple as that. If having a dead battery is an inconvenience (like you only own one car and have no spare battery hanging around) than it should be tested each fall after 3 years of age. In that way you can avoid having a crippled car by pinpointing declining battery condition early.
 

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I've followed the same routine for years: replace battery in new car after four years then every three years after that. New battery is less than $130, easy to replace, cheap insurance against failure. With much less use during past year I use trickle charge at beginning of each month to top off. No problems in PA sub zero cold or TX summers.
 

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My OEM battery lasted to around 4 years and 40k miles, I don't expect much more. I replaced it with an AGM battery from Walmart and photocopied the receipt so it'll last in the glove box for easy warranty replacement.
 

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2015 Chrysler T&C Touring L 36,000 miles (Brilliant Black w/Black Leather)
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My 2015 T&C Touring L just turned over 36,000 miles and I still have the original battery. After reading these posts I think I better change it out soon. I carry along a portable battery booster just in case it dies and haven't had to use it on this vehicle yet. I will be making a trip to Sams Club for new tires soon so I might as well get a new Energizer Battery there also.
 

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Auto batteries seem to have a broad like-expectancy curve. May ave 4+ yrs but with a wide variability. I've had OEMs last as short as 2 yrs (So Texas heat, small-for-engine-size battery) and as long as 7+ yrs (changed as preventive maint). IMHO old-time batteries (open 'check the water often' type) seemed to give longer life IF meticulously maintained (always proper H2O level, moderate temps, never fully discharged). I just recently replaced an old-style marine use battery at 17 years!

Sam's Club, WalMart, and PepBoys (on sale) have always been best bets for car batteries recently. And most of Sam's Club's Duracell line is still made in USA. I haven't bought a battery at Costco in years. Limited selection and only so-so pricing these days.
 

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Your "replace vehicle at 6 years" rule works if your main metric is having a new battery, but there are much cheaper ways to realize that. Batteries lately seem a crapshoot. I've had some fail within a few months and others last 7+ years. I always buy the Autozone Gold which has their best warranty and have used that many times. Our 2002 T&C is 20 years old, 276K miles, and the heads have never been off the engine. Great compression and passes emissions like-new. Still looks fine, and you must look closely to tell it isn't a new vehicle. Of course, I've had to replace parts, maybe driver's automated window twice (new cable-type fail in all cars). Worst was a cracked flexplate which required removing the transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Your "replace vehicle at 6 years" rule works if your main metric is having a new battery, but there are much cheaper ways to realize that. Batteries lately seem a crapshoot. I've had some fail within a few months and others last 7+ years. I always buy the Autozone Gold which has their best warranty and have used that many times. Our 2002 T&C is 20 years old, 276K miles, and the heads have never been off the engine. Great compression and passes emissions like-new. Still looks fine, and you must look closely to tell it isn't a new vehicle. Of course, I've had to replace parts, maybe driver's automated window twice (new cable-type fail in all cars). Worst was a cracked flexplate which required removing the transmission.
The 2002s were good vehicles. So, your vehicle is working great in spite of several heart transplants. :)
 

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2009 Chrysler Town and Country
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One thing i learned over the last 30 years is when you test a battery as often as i do and it test good but recharge and you have no other electronic problems. You are on borrowed time when you load test and it good recharge you have a boarder line battery .

It might start the vehicle fine but you can believe your chances of making it through extreame situation like a hot summer or cold winter is slim .
 

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2009 Chrysler Town and Country
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Auto batteries seem to have a broad like-expectancy curve. May ave 4+ yrs but with a wide variability. I've had OEMs last as short as 2 yrs (So Texas heat, small-for-engine-size battery) and as long as 7+ yrs (changed as preventive maint). IMHO old-time batteries (open 'check the water often' type) seemed to give longer life IF meticulously maintained (always proper H2O level, moderate temps, never fully discharged). I just recently replaced an old-style marine use battery at 17 years!

Sam's Club, WalMart, and PepBoys (on sale) have always been best bets for car batteries recently. And most of Sam's Club's Duracell line is still made in USA. I haven't bought a battery at Costco in years. Limited selection and only so-so pricing these days.
The shop i work in carries Duracell and the always come back to be exchanged . I don't use them in my vehicles . I use what ever NAPAs top line is

I have a AGM in my 10 TC and so far its been good . The Advance battery that was in there when i bought the vehicle in August was not even a year old crapped out .
 
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