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I want to replace leaking radiator. Bought one on amazon the one has two posts sticking up. Im guess for radiator support. Mine does not have this. The support the radiator comes from metal cross member its a L shaped bracket except on the horizontal it has rubber oval piece that goes into spot about 5 1/2" from side of radiator. Ive tried autozone that outher parts place with mc or and Monument Auto parts which is a parts store ive done biz with for over 40 yrs. None of the radiators were the right one. Help me please! Thanks so much.
 

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Howdy Rollin, Welcome!

Pictures and/or part numbers so I can see what you are concerned with.

I'm an aircraft mechanic, so when I order parts, they must be appropriate for year, make, model, and serial number... Same goes for my cars, boats, and motorcycles.

I suggest you google "Mopar Parts" and pick a dealership's online parts diagram for the factory part for your year, make, model.
Find your part number that is applicable for your vehicle, THEN... google that part number to find a deal on an aftermarket on Amazon, Rock Auto.com, or even eBay... [pro tip, highlight the part number, right click, then "search on google"]

** Now you are likely going to see a dealership called MoparPartsGiant... And they are good folks and sometimes have good prices... BUT, I find their parts catalog to be difficult, so pick another one that shows pictures, diagrams and the individual part links.

Remember, the cost is how much it will be to have someone drop it on your doorstep (S&H / tax included)
Oh yeah, almost forgot... I find Walmart of all places to be a good source for all sorts of good parts too. (Free shipping, pick up at store many times)
 

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Some radiators come with an extra piece that you may not need. Replaced the radiator on an 07 GC within the past year. Seems to me there was a bar across the top that wasn't needed and was removable, to make things work. At the bottom, there are two prongs on the radiator that sit in two holes with rubber bushings. Make sure they are in place well. The replacement was a Spectra like so:

Didn't need the top bar with prongs, IIRC.
 
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Your radiator can be replaced without taking off the front fascia. Take off the fan housing, the stuff on top, and you should be able to unhook the radiator from the condenser (two hooks), and pull it out. Takes a little patience with the unhooking. Have a good light handy so you can see what's going on down there. Can cut your hands too so take care.

This looks about right. There's also a video somewhere, in Spanish, that's good and easy to follow, even though LEVY isn't there to help out with the translation. :) I will keep looking for it.
 

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One more thing comes to mind, is the overflow fitting to the reservoir.
I have become aware that some of the aftermarket radiators have a nipple that was too small diameter for the hose.

It is important that you get an airtight seal to that hose because, after you drive and the radiator is cooling, the expanded fluid will contract and draw that fluid back from the reservoir (well, it is supposed to...)

If you have a small tube coming off the radiator and try to clamp the oversize hose down too far with a spiral type 'jubilee' clamp, you probably will not get that vacuum seal required for that to work right.

Rollin, please let us know if the answers you were provided helped in your situation, and how your repair goes - what you find, observe.
Thank you and have a great weekend!
 

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One more thing comes to mind, is the overflow fitting to the reservoir.
I have become aware that some of the aftermarket radiators have a nipple that was too small diameter for the hose.
Good thinking GATOR. Ran into that problem. A small worm type clamp was the solution. That hose should be clamped anyway.
Can't beat those worm type clamps. :)
I can remember years back, actually many decades ago, using a copper wire, twisted to tighten, as a clamp, in that situation. Bet you haven't done that. :)
 

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Good thinking GATOR. Ran into that problem. A small worm type clamp was the solution. That hose should be clamped anyway.
Can't beat those worm type clamps. :)
I can remember years back, actually many decades ago, using a copper wire, twisted to tighten, as a clamp, in that situation. Bet you haven't done that. :)
When I replaced our radiator, the overflow hose didn't have a clamp on it either. So I put one on it after installing the new radiator. You would think they would have put one on it. It's not like a vacuum hose, which most don't have a clamp on them.
 

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No clamp needed if you are replacing both, radiator and overflow hose with O.E. parts.

But, good advice to use a clamp if only replacing one of them. Use a constant pressure clamp, of course. 🤣
 

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Also, it's a really good time to check your radiator overflow tube that runs from the top of the radiator across and down to the overflow tank. Make sure there is no sludge or rust built up in this. You can take it off down below and drain the coolant. Then take it right up and out, and run a stiff metal wire (or similar) right through it, and then flush it through with water. When I replaced my cooling system on an '03, I never did this. Later on, a couple of years later, the tube got restricted and blew out my radiator again! Please don't make the same mistake I did.
 

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Also, it's a really good time to check your radiator overflow tube..... Make sure there is no sludge or rust built up in this. When I replaced my cooling system on an '03, I never did this. Later on, a couple of years later, the tube got restricted and blew out my radiator again! Please don't make the same mistake I did.
There is no way this overflow hose can blew your radiator, no way.
 

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There is no way this overflow hose can blew your radiator, no way.
Yes there is a way. The whole thing was clogged with rust and sludge - completely blocked (180K on it at that time). When the van was completely warmed up, the whole system pressurized. I wish that I didn't have to change the radiator, but I had to. Did it myself, and cleared the problem up completely. Never a problem since, thankfully (211K on it now).
 

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Yes there is a way. The whole thing was clogged with rust and sludge - completely blocked (180K on it at that time). When the van was completely warmed up, the whole system pressurized. I wish that I didn't have to change the radiator, but I had to. Did it myself, and cleared the problem up completely. Never a problem since, thankfully (211K on it now).

On a properly maintained vehicle, that hose will never get clogged. On a poorly maintained vehicle it might, but radiator will not get damaged due to a clogged overflow hose, that hose will get dislodged first (there is a reason why those hoses never have a clamp on either side). In your case, your vehicle was evidently poorly maintained, your radiator blew up for a different reason.
 

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On a properly maintained vehicle, that hose will never get clogged. On a poorly maintained vehicle it might, but radiator will not get damaged due to a clogged overflow hose, that hose will get dislodged first (there is a reason why those hoses never have a clamp on either side). In your case, your vehicle was evidently poorly maintained, your radiator blew up for a different reason.
I'm not sure if the overflow tank hose caused your radiator to blow, but I do agree with making sure to clean out the overflow tank and hose. At 284K miles, never had an issue with a clogged radiator over flow hose. As LEVY said, a well maintained cooling system should never get clogged. I check the coolant condition in the fall every year and do a complete flush and refill every 5 yrs. or 150K miles.
 

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Those spring type clamps will let go and release pressure.
Can't imagine the hose getting plugged from normal use unless one loaded it up with stop leak.
 

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On a properly maintained vehicle, that hose will never get clogged. On a poorly maintained vehicle it might, but radiator will not get damaged due to a clogged overflow hose, that hose will get dislodged first (there is a reason why those hoses never have a clamp on either side). In your case, your vehicle was evidently poorly maintained, your radiator blew up for a different reason.
With ya on that. Not sure why. This van has got 211,000 miles on it now, and runs like any newer car on the street. Cheers!
 
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Those spring type clamps will let go and release pressure.
Can't imagine the hose getting plugged from normal use unless one loaded it up with stop leak.
Frustrated me as well. A good amount of turning wrenches that would rather had not done.....
 

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Frozen maybe? Straight water added to the reservoir before a freeze?
 

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There is no way this overflow hose can blew your radiator, no way.
Thus why Walter does not put a clamp BUT... The burst value of that hose (not reinforced) is probably lower than the strength of the radiator.

Interesting claim that the clogged hose caused radiator failure.
 

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Thus why Walter does not put a clamp BUT... The burst value of that hose (not reinforced) is probably lower than the strength of the radiator.

Interesting claim that the clogged hose caused radiator failure.

Correct. Easy to blame this little hose for lack of maintenance.

As Jeepman said, stuff in that hose was probably some kind of stop leak, or worst, iron sediments for using straight water instead of approved coolant.

I will never advise anyone to use stop leak anywhere, it might work for a while but nothing like properly repairs, including replacing parts that need to be replaced.
 
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